New chicks.

Discussion in 'Raising Baby Chicks' started by Morglez, Mar 15, 2017.

  1. Morglez

    Morglez Out Of The Brooder

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    Ok so, this is my first time purchasing some babies. I dont have a ton of experience with chicks. I have one chick that was hatched by one of my hens, so she did all the work for me. That baby has grown quite well and is healthy. I have the chicks set up in a tote in a room that we keep reptiles in (I know, that just seems cruel but it's the warmest place in the house lol), so it's nice and warm in there at around 85F to 89F. We shouldn't have to keep them inside much longer since the cold temps have mostly left us here in central Florida. Right now I have them on newspaper, but will change to Aspen soon. When should I do that? Also, I was wondering if I should put something in there for them to perch on? Do chicks that young like to perch? Here is a picture of their set up for now:
    [​IMG]
    I know they grow fast, and won't be able to stay in there for long, but I was just wondering if it's set up ok for right now. If there is anything I should be doing differently, please let me know! I just checked on them, and they have calmed down nicely. They are chirping, but it's a more calm chirp. One of them is even sounding like a little song bird, it's so cute. I feel like if they were too stressed or cold, they would still be chirping loudly and not settled in.
     
  2. MsDaisy

    MsDaisy Just Hatched

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    I gave my chicks aspen as soon as they got home, Young chicks don't need something to perch on. They might like they might not, So it's totally up to you[​IMG]
     
  3. Morglez

    Morglez Out Of The Brooder

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    Ok, I wasn't sure. I didn't know if their little tiny poops would be too difficult to find to clean out of the Aspen. Thanks!
     
  4. peopleRanimals2

    peopleRanimals2 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Hi!
    I have a couple of suggestions for you.
    The temperature that you should have your chicks at is around 95 degrees F at week one, and decrease the temp by about 5 degrees each week, until they are almost fully feathered. The heat lamp should be in a place so that the chicks can go under it if they are cold, and out from under the heat if they get hot. The food and water should be somewhere in the middle. (They can go outside when they are almost fully feathered, or if the temp outside has consistently reached the brooder temp.)
    I agree with MsDaisy, you should transition to aspen as soon as possible. Newspaper is slippery, and chicks can slip on it and end up with splayed legs.
    Young chicks will experiment on perches, but they will start using them more as they get older. I hot glued a strong stick to two blocks of wood, about an inch and a half high, and put it in my chick's brooder. They loved it! :)
    Once they get too big for that bin, a good place to transfer them to is a dog crate, with cardboard tied on the sides.
    Otherwise, they seem pretty happy! Do you feed them treats? It's really funny to watch them eat plain yogurt [​IMG]
    If you feed them treats harder than hard boiled eggs, it might be a good idea to provide some chick grit. :) Then they can have all the treats they want :)
    Have fun with your chicks!!!!
    If you have any questions, feel free to ask. [​IMG]
     
  5. peopleRanimals2

    peopleRanimals2 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    *Heat lamp or heating pad or whatever source of heat you use :)
     
  6. Morglez

    Morglez Out Of The Brooder

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    Ok, I think in their tote it is probably warmer. I should have clarified...The ROOM temp is around 85F - 89F, but I have their tote right next to one of the heat lamps, so I am sure it is warmer for them. I will stick a thermometer in there to check for sure though. The lamp is next to just one end as well, so they can still move away from the heat if needed.

    As for the treats, I literally just got them today, so I haven't done that yet. I will have to pick up some yogurt though, that sounds fun to watch!

    Also, I will go ahead and switch them to the Aspen tomorrow.

    Thanks for the help! :)
     
  7. lazy gardener

    lazy gardener True BYC Addict

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    Welcome to BYC. You really don't need to keep those babies that warm. As a matter of fact, keeping them in a room that is consistently that warm is not good for them. What they do need is: a place in the brooder where they can get warm. Many of us are now using heating pads that bypass the auto shut off after 2 hours feature, so they will stay on 24/7. Those pads are formed into a little cave or tunnel using scrap fencing, and covered with cloth to keep sharp edges covered and keep the chicks from getting tangled in the fencing. The chicks then treat those heating pad caves just like they would a mother hen: run under her when they are cold or scared, otherwise, they are out running around in their coop or brooder, exploring their world. They can be brooded right outside in the coop with this arrangement, and it does wonders to foster good feather development, good weaning from heat source, good social development. While the old recommendation for heat lamp is 90 - 95* the first week, many of us have found that 85 - 90 the first week is more than sufficient, with incremental decreases from there. Start weaning the babies off heat source at 2 - 3 weeks by turning the lamp off for increasing lengths of time. By the time the babies are 3 weeks old, they won't need heat at all during the day, if they are inside. By using a heating pad cave for heat source, babies wean themselves, it's not possible to overheat them. No matter what you use, it's very important that the entire brooder NOT be heated. They NEED to be able to get away from the heat source. In your reptile room, they don't have that option.
     
    Last edited: Mar 15, 2017
  8. Morglez

    Morglez Out Of The Brooder

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    Hmm, ok. When you say heat pad, can I use one that we buy to use on ourselves that doesn't have an auto shut off? Or is it a special type?
    I just checked on them again, and they seem to stay huddled in the corner that is closest to the lamp, so now I am wondering if it's not warm enough in there for them. They don't seem stressed, and they aren't chirping to much or too loudly, so they seem fine, but I don't know. Thank you for your help!
     
  9. peopleRanimals2

    peopleRanimals2 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    You could move the lamp a little more into the middle of the brooder, and if they still stay huddled under it you should lower it a little bit, until they seem to be using the whole brooder.
     
  10. chickens really

    chickens really Overrun With Chickens

    Newly hatched chicks need heat...If huddled up ? They are cold...Chicks can suffer from starve out if to much time is spent keeping warm....Happy Chicks hop around eating and drinking , softly peeping.....

    News paper is not recommended for chicks...Put in pine shavings....

    Best of luck......


    Cheers!
     

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