New cockerel

Elliecurrie

In the Brooder
Jun 1, 2020
21
26
23
Okay so I need some advice, we hatched some cross hens and they have fully matured, we have decided to get a cockerel to put with them, we ended up with a Brahma cockerel as we tried a smaller one and they attacked him as he was a lot smaller a younger than them ( they are large birds). The new guy came and we put him in a pen next to them to get used to each other, eventually we put them together and they had a little scrap and they were fine and I even think he mated with the smallest one who actually was who I thought was broody ( she is head of the pack ) it’s the next day since we introduced them they stayed in the purch together last night and were fine but now the hens keep chasing him and he is scared of them and he keeps hiding in the nesting boxes, he is slightly younger than the hens but he is 1 year and a bit, think girls are 2-3.
He is a bigger than them too.
Does it just take time for them to sort each other out, I feel like he is already at the bottom of the pecking order.
Will they ever get on and mate or am I doing something wrong
 

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aart

Chicken Juggler!
Premium Feather Member
8 Years
Nov 27, 2012
95,182
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SW Michigan
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It's going to take time.
Make sure he get to eat and drink.
Might have to separate him if he gets too stressed to give him a break.
Adding a mature male is usually the easiest integration, but not always.

Some of these points might help:
Integration Basics:
It's all about territory and resources(space/food/water).
Existing birds will almost always attack new ones to defend their resources.
Understanding chicken behaviors is essential to integrating new birds into your flock.

Confine new birds within sight but physically segregated from older/existing birds for several weeks, so they can see and get used to each other but not physically interact.

In adjacent runs, spread scratch grains along the dividing mesh, best if mesh is just big enough for birds to stick their head thru, so they get used to eating together.

The more space, the better.
Birds will peck to establish dominance, the pecked bird needs space to get away. As long as there's no copious blood drawn and/or new bird is not trapped/pinned down and beaten unmercilessly, let them work it out. Every time you interfere or remove new birds, they'll have to start the pecking order thing all over again.

Multiple feed/water stations. Dominance issues are most often carried out over sustenance, more stations lessens the frequency of that issue.

Places for the new birds to hide 'out of line of sight'(but not a dead end trap) and/or up and away from any bully birds. Roosts, pallets or boards leaned up against walls or up on concrete blocks, old chairs tables, branches, logs, stumps out in the run can really help. Lots of diversion and places to 'hide' instead of bare wide open run.
Good ideas for hiding places:
https://www.backyardchickens.com/threads/a-cluttered-run.1323792/
 

Jac Jac

Songster
May 6, 2019
292
988
193
Savannah, Chatham County, GA
It's going to take time.
Make sure he get to eat and drink.
Might have to separate him if he gets too stressed to give him a break.
Adding a mature male is usually the easiest integration, but not always.

Some of these points might help:
Integration Basics:
It's all about territory and resources(space/food/water).
Existing birds will almost always attack new ones to defend their resources.
Understanding chicken behaviors is essential to integrating new birds into your flock.

Confine new birds within sight but physically segregated from older/existing birds for several weeks, so they can see and get used to each other but not physically interact.

In adjacent runs, spread scratch grains along the dividing mesh, best if mesh is just big enough for birds to stick their head thru, so they get used to eating together.

The more space, the better. Birds will peck to establish dominance, the pecked bird needs space to get away. As long as there's no copious blood drawn and/or new bird is not trapped/pinned down and beaten unmercilessly, let them work it out. Every time you interfere or remove new birds, they'll have to start the pecking order thing all over again.

Multiple feed/water stations. Dominance issues are most often carried out over sustenance, more stations lessens the frequency of that issue.

Places for the new birds to hide 'out of line of sight'(but not a dead end trap) and/or up and away from any bully birds. Roosts, pallets or boards leaned up against walls or up on concrete blocks, old chairs tables, branches, logs, stumps out in the run can really help. Lots of diversion and places to 'hide' instead of bare wide open run.
Good ideas for hiding places:
https://www.backyardchickens.com/threads/a-cluttered-run.1323792/
Wonderful and timely advice. So where were you when I was sick and had no one to check my flocks two months ago? Anyway, thanks for a few choice words - well spoken.
 

Elliecurrie

In the Brooder
Jun 1, 2020
21
26
23
It's going to take time.
Make sure he get to eat and drink.
Might have to separate him if he gets too stressed to give him a break.
Adding a mature male is usually the easiest integration, but not always.

Some of these points might help:
Integration Basics:
It's all about territory and resources(space/food/water).
Existing birds will almost always attack new ones to defend their resources.
Understanding chicken behaviors is essential to integrating new birds into your flock.

Confine new birds within sight but physically segregated from older/existing birds for several weeks, so they can see and get used to each other but not physically interact.

In adjacent runs, spread scratch grains along the dividing mesh, best if mesh is just big enough for birds to stick their head thru, so they get used to eating together.

The more space, the better. Birds will peck to establish dominance, the pecked bird needs space to get away. As long as there's no copious blood drawn and/or new bird is not trapped/pinned down and beaten unmercilessly, let them work it out. Every time you interfere or remove new birds, they'll have to start the pecking order thing all over again.

Multiple feed/water stations. Dominance issues are most often carried out over sustenance, more stations lessens the frequency of that issue.

Places for the new birds to hide 'out of line of sight'(but not a dead end trap) and/or up and away from any bully birds. Roosts, pallets or boards leaned up against walls or up on concrete blocks, old chairs tables, branches, logs, stumps out in the run can really help. Lots of diversion and places to 'hide' instead of bare wide open run.
Good ideas for hiding places:
https://www.backyardchickens.com/threads/a-cluttered-run.1323792/

thank you so much, we have put multiple water sources and feed in pen, I have put some big sticks for them to jump up on and opened the bottom half of the pen too so he can escape, i think hopefully in time they should settle I have kind of left them to there own devices today and just peeped my head over just in case they are fighting and they seem to just be keeping out of each other’s way, i feel so bad for him the first day he was here he was shouting and i haven’t heard a peep since they started fighting 😕 fingers crossed ❤️
 

Alkara

Songster
Feb 17, 2021
205
602
131
New South Wales, Australia
thank you so much, we have put multiple water sources and feed in pen, I have put some big sticks for them to jump up on and opened the bottom half of the pen too so he can escape, i think hopefully in time they should settle I have kind of left them to there own devices today and just peeped my head over just in case they are fighting and they seem to just be keeping out of each other’s way, i feel so bad for him the first day he was here he was shouting and i haven’t heard a peep since they started fighting 😕 fingers crossed ❤️

Hi I know this is quite an old thread but I've been having the same problem when introducing a young cockerel today to my flock of hens. Was just wondering how it went in the end for you? Thanks.
 

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