New Coop I built

Discussion in 'Coop & Run - Design, Construction, & Maintenance' started by catfishlee, Apr 13, 2017.

  1. catfishlee

    catfishlee New Egg

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  2. Leah567

    Leah567 Hopelessly Addicted

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    My Coop
    Welcome to Backyard Chickens![​IMG] That's a cool looking coop.
     
  3. Kellycbf

    Kellycbf Out Of The Brooder

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    That is nice. Thanks for sharing.
     
  4. scooter123

    scooter123 Just Hatched

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    Sweet
     
  5. aart

    aart Chicken Juggler! Premium Member

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    My Coop
    Welcome to BYC @catfishlee !!!
    Rotten egg...hahaha!

    Nice tractor!!

    Moved by hand?
    You must be strong.

    Would love to see more details, overall dimensions, wheels in mobile position, climate/location, population capacity, etc.
     
  6. catfishlee

    catfishlee New Egg

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    Used a tractor to move it. It is very heavy so this only gets moved a few times a year. This is 16' long by 8 ' wide. Head room is a little over 6' in the center. Located in Middle Tennessee. We have mild winters and humid summers. My personal opinion on max capacity would be around 15 for full sized fowl . I currently only have 6 hens and they have more room than they know what to do with. My 4 road islands love the high roosting bars but my 2 buff orpingtons are being stubborn and wanting to roost around the nesting boxes. I will be raising some more chicks in a separate coop I have that I will transition into this one after they are 18 weeks old.
     
  7. JurassicBawk

    JurassicBawk Chillin' With My Peeps

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    [​IMG]Very nice. I have a straw garden with a permanent arch made out of 3 stock panels that looks very similar to your coop design. I was joking to my husband that if the garden didn't work out, we could turn it into a chicken coop. Now I know how. :) Hopefully the garden will actually produce this year since I'm also adding in bees for pollination, but I may close the ends and let the chickens in there this fall to help compost and mulch.
     
    Last edited: Apr 19, 2017
  8. catfishlee

    catfishlee New Egg

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    Yes, it is an inexpensive way to make coops & greenhouses. I went a bit over board with mine but you can make them lighter and alot more affordable than I did. Most people use an inexpensive tarps for the roof and the back. A few limbs for roost and you have a lighter weight version that is more mobile. Mine is heavier and more expensive but should require less upkeep than going the cheaper route. Plus it adds some character to our land rather than an eyesore. Are you using the panels to allow plants to run up them ? I do the same in my garden with cucumbers.
     
  9. SunHwaKwon

    SunHwaKwon Overrun With Chickens

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    Catfishlee - your coop setup is very nice! In my case I would put some pavers or something around it to deter the dang foxes we have around here, but otherwise it looks quite nice. How tall is it at the centerline?
     
  10. JurassicBawk

    JurassicBawk Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Quote:Yes, I grow tomatoes and beans in the straw bales (conditioned to be basically compost) and let them grow up/over the arch then just walk under and pick things as they grow. Then next spring the old straw goes into the concrete block bed for growing potatoes. It worked really well last year despite the lack of pollination, so this year I'm adding in more raised beds for veggies and flowers plus a bee hive. The chickens really like it when I'm conditioning the straw bales because they get all the grass that grows out of it, and of course help me dispose of any giant tomato-killing worms and extra veggies.
     

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