Clmirabilio92

Songster
Mar 27, 2019
108
87
111
I live in florida right now but I will be moving to New york very soon. I was looking at coops online and I just cant find one that I like or trust actually fitting as many chickens as it says it will. I am now looking In to maybe a shed. I have 10 chickens right now, but I will most likely get some more after moving up there, not sure exactly how man . If I wanted to be on the safe side, how big of a shed should I be looking at? I know it needs to have ventilation for moisture to be released out of it, so how does that work in a shed, how would the chickens get up on to their roosts? This will be my first time with my chickens and ducks in the winter and the snow. Just wanna make sure they will be comfortable and safe. Thanks!!
 
Last edited:

wamtazlady

Crowing
7 Years
Jul 18, 2013
1,618
1,903
286
Kalispell MT
Plan on at least 4 square feet per bird in the coop. The run should have about 10 square feet per bird. How large of a shed you will need depends on how many birds you want to have. Figure out the most birds you will be getting and multiply by 4. That is the minimum size you will need. If you think you may get even more than that get a larger shed.

Ventilation is very necessary if you want your birds to stay warm and comfortable during the winter. Remember that a dry chicken is a warm chicken. Might seem strange to be venting out warm but moist air to keep the birds comfortable but that is what you will need to do. I have about 10 square feet of ventilation in my coop built for 12 chickens. The vents are never closed and I live in NW Montana. It would be wise to plan on roofing the run. Many chickens don't like to walk on snow. Roofing the run means the chickens can go out all day every day no matter how much snow or rain there is.
 

aart

Chicken Juggler!
Premium Feather Member
7 Years
Nov 27, 2012
84,199
97,495
1,677
SW Michigan
My Coop
I know it needs to have ventilation for moisture to be released out of it, so how does that work in a shed, how would the chickens get up on to their roosts?
Big roof overhangs with open soffits will work well in the north, for 24/7/365 ventilation protected from the weather.

Have you already bought the new place in NY?
Do they allow chickens there?
Another thought is moving breeds between states is frowned upon,
for good reason,
look into the regs and health checks needed to do so.
 

Clmirabilio92

Songster
Mar 27, 2019
108
87
111
Thank you! I might just leave the chickens I have here with family and get new chickens up there. I was told the people up there have more hardy breeds bc of the winters.

Big roof overhangs with open soffits will work well in the north, for 24/7/365 ventilation protected from the weather.

Have you already bought the new place in NY?
Do they allow chickens there?
Another thought is moving breeds between states is frowned upon,
for good reason,
look into the regs and health checks needed to do so.
 

aart

Chicken Juggler!
Premium Feather Member
7 Years
Nov 27, 2012
84,199
97,495
1,677
SW Michigan
My Coop
Thank you! I might just leave the chickens I have here with family and get new chickens up there. I was told the people up there have more hardy breeds bc of the winters.
Might not be a bad idea....will make the big move a lot simpler...and give you time to plan and build a coop 'at your leisure'.
 

blackdog043

Crowing
Feb 19, 2017
2,270
3,676
386
Charlotte, NC
Thank you! I might just leave the chickens I have here with family and get new chickens up there. I was told the people up there have more hardy breeds bc of the winters.
This would be the best thing to do. Get yourself settled in first, then decide what the needs for the chickens will be. A covered run will keep you from shoveling snow out of it and the chickens will be more willing to go out there. Make sure it will support the snow load or have a roof rake.
 

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