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New DIY incubator and results

Discussion in 'Incubating & Hatching Eggs' started by tantor, Sep 14, 2016.

  1. I don't get on here as much as I'd like to but I lurk from time to time. I just wanted to share my new(to me) incubator and the results. I took an old Starbucks refrigerator and gutted it, saving the wires, the fan and the racks and made my incubator. I used 2 ceramic light sockets with 40 watt appliance bulbs as my heat source. My thermostat is a Mh1210F that I ordered off EBay. It is a digital thermostat that works great. I also ordered some digital thermometer/hygrometers to be able to keep track of the humidity. My humidity control is a glass pie plate from Goodwill sitting on the rack at the top. My wife ordered me a turner for Father's Day because she got tired of me trying to plot out how to make my own. All together, I think the turner cost more than everything else, or very close. I set 12 eggs on August 18th. I noticed my humidity was hovering around 75% so I started reading all I could(again) in the learning center and basically went with the dry hatch method. I took the water out and my humidity dropped down to 30%-35% where I kept it until time for lockdown. After a week, I candled and tossed 2 duds. Everything else looked good until about 4-5 days later. That's when the odor started and one started leaking. I took it out and cracked it(very carefully outside) and it was a dud too. They are Austrolorps so some were hard to see through. On day 18, I raised the humidity back to about 70%, turned the turner off and waited anxiously.Early on day 20, I noticed that 2 eggs had pipped. But to make a long story shorter, by the end of day 21, all 9 hatched out. I'll attach some pictures, in no particular order, and try to answer any questions. I'm always looking to improve and help out where I can. My wife, a school teacher, is already planning future hatches.
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  2. sumi

    sumi Égalité Staff Member

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    That was a fantastic hatch and a really neat looking incubator! [​IMG]
     
  3. Thank you. It was a lot of fun to build. I wasn't expecting that good of a hatch rate. Maybe I should quit while I'm ahead!
     
  4. sumi

    sumi Égalité Staff Member

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    Or start a hatchery service [​IMG]
     
  5. MeepBeep

    MeepBeep Chillin' With My Peeps

    Refrigerators are generally air tight, if you have not drilled or cut in any ventilation I suggest you do that, doing so might also help mediate humidity... You don't need a lot, just a few 1/4" - 1/2" drill holes will suffice in most cases...
     
  6. It had a little hole in the bottom where a drain line exited. I didn't use the drain but I left the hole there and I drilled a 2" hole in the top right corner so I could run the power cord for the turner and the cord for one of the hygrometers. It also had a couple of small holes for the old wire to run through. I read somewhere that surface area is more important than quantity so I took some out and that lowered my humidity. I will probably try to get a smaller pan and try different locations on the shelf. All in all, I'm very pleased with the way it worked
     

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