New dominant rooster

Discussion in 'Managing Your Flock' started by Kayenichol, Apr 20, 2019.

  1. Kayenichol

    Kayenichol In the Brooder

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    we just introduced a new rooster into our flock. We only have 4 hens and pullets that are not of age. We knew the new rooster (foghorn leghorn) and our rooster (falcon) were gonna fight it out. (We were watching to make sure they weren’t in any danger) well foghorn won and falcon definitely is not happy lol but our 4 hens do not want anything to do with foghorn. They still run to falcon. Is this normal? *** just to clarify, we had to introduce foghorn because we had no other place for him and he was just thrown into our laps so to say** we are raising a lot more hens so both have a decent size harem
     
  2. Mrs. K

    Mrs. K Crowing

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    Well I think this is going to be very hard on your hens. This is going to continually to cause a lot of tension in the flock, and I rather doubt that the fight is over if the hens are still choosing the old rooster.

    Not all birds will work in your flock, if you are raising a lot more hens, how old are they now? If they are chicks, it will be months before they are ready for a rooster. And months is a long time for the 4 hens to have to deal with 2 roosters.

    To have two strange to each other roosters, work in a flock, you would need IMO, a flock of 25-30 laying hens and the space for those birds. Hens that are currently laying before being introduced into the flock. Roosters really do not get the concept of sharing hens. And they are going to be pretty much, constantly fighting, and constantly trying to dominate the hens. I would expect the 4 hens to be worn out with all of that, they will start to hide and eat less.

    Chickens won't just be nice and get along. Perhaps I am misreading they whole set up, but I am a bit worried about your coop size, and the area of your run? Often times if people only have 5 birds, the set up is for a smaller flock.

    It would be helpful to know the ages of the pullets, and the number of pullets. The size of the coop and run to give more positive information. But with the information you are presenting, I would strongly suggest giving the new rooster back. Even if that means that who ever had him, will cull him. Don't ever take birds you feel sorry for, they just tend to ruin your flock dynamics.

    IMO - you have set yourself up for ongoing cock fighting, and highly harassed hens. There may be a bird or two who die over the fighting, and I would expect the egg laying to go down. Perhaps I have misjudged the situation.

    Mrs K
     
  3. keesmom

    keesmom Crowing

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    Just because he was dumped on you is not a reason to have to keep him. If your flock was happy the way it was you should consider keeping it that way.
     
    DobieLover, aart and Mrs. K like this.
  4. Kayenichol

    Kayenichol In the Brooder

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    I had two roosters in the beginning. Falcon and his brother nugget who never fought and did share the hens. They each had their own hens. About maybe 10-11 each. Our coop and run is big enough for at least 50 chickens all together with them still having ample space. The hens we have now were bought and had never been with any rooster before falcon. Our chicks are not of age yet and do have a lot of growing to do. At first the fighting stopped and they both went their separate ways. But after a while foghorn started trying to kill my falcon even though falcon was being very submissive. Don’t know why
     
  5. Kayenichol

    Kayenichol In the Brooder

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    We don’t know what to do with him. We have huge hearts and cannot just kill him. But at the same time I feel like I’m doing him wrong being where he’s at
     
  6. DobieLover

    DobieLover Easily distracted by chickens

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    Isolate him in a large dog crate and rehome him. If he is nice, advertise him as such. I found a new home for a gorgeous, friendly cockerel. It took about 2 weeks.
     
    animalcule and aart like this.
  7. Mrs. K

    Mrs. K Crowing

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    There is a difference between roosters raised as brothers, and strange roosters. The best duo, I have ever had, and I only had 8 hens at the time, was a father/son pair of roosters. From my own experience, those tend to be best. Roosters raised together sometimes work, and sometimes for some unknown reason (to people) they can go at it. Sometimes it will re-work itself out, and sometimes it won't. Strange roosters to each other IS HOW people set up cock fighting. Some roosters are good at fighting and some are not, but that won't stop an aggressive rooster. He wants the other rooster dead or gone.

    Sometimes I think that chickens are not a good fit for people with a great deal of sensibility. They are too soft hearted, and chickens takes a bit of toughness sometimes. What I think, is that if you keep this situation as it is, you will shortly be very sorry for your hens. Two roosters can ruin peoples enjoyment of chickens.

    Do not keep him, sell him, give him away, and do not ask questions. He really is not your responsibility, the rest of the flock is. Always solve problems for the peace of your flock.

    Mrs K
     

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