New FARM INNOVATORS PRO 4200 CHICKEN EGG CIRCULATING AIR INCUBATOR

Discussion in 'Incubating & Hatching Eggs' started by Mrsroeder2012, Jan 17, 2014.

  1. Mrsroeder2012

    Mrsroeder2012 Out Of The Brooder

    89
    1
    43
    Aug 8, 2012
    Jamestown,Ky
    My Coop
    I just bought this and got it the 16th of this month, and I am NEW at this and so I don't know what to do, my manual to my bator said to do the temp and 95.5 to 100 and the humidity at 50 to 60% and then 67% after 18 days, I would like to know what U do...My house stays 70 all year around and I live in Kentucky......... let me know thank you !
     
  2. bugglesmommy

    bugglesmommy Chillin' With My Peeps

    First of all DO NOT NOT NOT trust the built in thermometer and humidity gauge. I have the same model - well one of my 3 is a Farm Innovators. Get another thermometer/hydrometer.

    As far as what humidity levels to use, do some research into wet vs. dry incubation. I personally dry hatch and incubate at about 30-35% and up to about 60% humidity. The incubator you have should hold humidity well so you may not need to add much water. Getting it perfect to where you want it will take some practice. The temp should be at 99.5 - 100. Throughout the entire hatch. Keep it in a draft free area and run it for a while until you find the right temp. consistently. Consistent house temps. will make that easier. BIG END ALWAYS UP if in a turner. When laying naturally the highest point is already in the air cell zone.

    After day 18 the chicks are getting into position to hatch and do not need to be turned. You need to remove the turner and lay them down while upping the humidity. This is called "lockdown" because in most cases you should not open the incubator until the hatch is complete. If they are bantam eggs they will likely hatch sooner then 21 days so I would suggest locking down a day early.

    When the chicks hatch - it is not a quick process. First the chicks will pip into the air cell and breathe. Eventually 12-24 hours later they will pip a hole and finish absorbing the yolk sack. This step can take upwards of 30 HOURS. When the chick is ready it will twist in a circle knocking a line all the way around the top and push it off (zipping).

    I know the first hatch can be scary - feel free to ask me anything at any time.
     
    Last edited: Jan 17, 2014
  3. Mrsroeder2012

    Mrsroeder2012 Out Of The Brooder

    89
    1
    43
    Aug 8, 2012
    Jamestown,Ky
    My Coop
    OH My Gosh u help out a lot and th I totally understudied everything u said and it sounds so easy to do, I am going to be buying a new temp and humidity gauge....What is the difference in wet or dry hatching I never heard that before ?how much should up the humidity when LOCKDOWN happens
     
  4. bugglesmommy

    bugglesmommy Chillin' With My Peeps

    It depends on how you choose to incubate. Dry incubation uses lower humidity throughout the hatch while wet incubation uses higher levels. There is no exact answer on humidity so It's going to kind of have to be a personal choice and finding what works for you. How much at lockdown depends on how you incubate.

    Also will these eggs be shipped or local? Shipped eggs can be trickier as they often have rattled air cells.
     
  5. bugglesmommy

    bugglesmommy Chillin' With My Peeps

  6. Mrsroeder2012

    Mrsroeder2012 Out Of The Brooder

    89
    1
    43
    Aug 8, 2012
    Jamestown,Ky
    My Coop
    I will be incubating 15 of my own eggs from my chickens......LOL I feel nervous now, I want to do this right and I would like all my eggs to hatch but I could be asking ALOT!
     
  7. bugglesmommy

    bugglesmommy Chillin' With My Peeps

    Good. Home eggs are much easier to hatch. 100% hatch is a bit hopeful for a first time hatch - so don't get too upset if you lose a few.
     
  8. Mrsroeder2012

    Mrsroeder2012 Out Of The Brooder

    89
    1
    43
    Aug 8, 2012
    Jamestown,Ky
    My Coop
    I read some to most of the link u sent me and it was very helpful and ill read more and it had a little pic of the wet and dry hatching but I still didn't understand that part, wouldn't dry hatching kinda cook them instead of the wet hatching ? Im sorry if I have SO many questions but I am so curious and want to make sure I do this all right
     
  9. bugglesmommy

    bugglesmommy Chillin' With My Peeps

    [​IMG]Lol. The whole process is cooking them is a whole different way except you get a chicken instead of an omelette. [​IMG] That' how I prefer my eggs! I have hatched more then my fair (sane)amount and personally dry hatch. It's not completely dry, like I said 30-35% humidity for most of the incubation. I have gotten much better hatch rates this way as have many other people. If you think about it that chicken doesn't have special water wells under her butt when she hatches her own eggs. End the end it's your call - I just would not recommend going over 80% at hatch. Too high and the chicks can drown. The best way to tell if you need to adjust is to candle periodically (hold a bright flashlight -I use LED flashlights - to the egg and monitor the air cell development to make sure it's on track). Too high and the air cell will be smaller then it should. Too low and it will be larger then its suppose to be.

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Jan 17, 2014
  10. bugglesmommy

    bugglesmommy Chillin' With My Peeps

    Oh and I should include a warning the incubator does not include:


    WARNING: HIGHLY ADDICTIVE

    [​IMG]
     
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