New Flock Social Issue

Sonnygs

Chirping
6 Years
Jun 19, 2015
7
4
62
I purchased 18 chicks on 9/1/21 which was a mixture of Easter Eggers, Silver Laced Wyndottes, Buff Orpintons, White Rocks, and Sussex Pullets. I had to wait 10 days to 9/10/21 to get the Black Copper Marans I wanted. Ended up getting 12 Maran chicks that were straight run. Initially had to use two separate brooders but when I moved all to their new coop home, I put them all together and they have gotten along but have really stayed mostly separated. There have not been any real problems with fighting and getting along. Low and behold one of the Easter Eggers ended up being a very dominant young rooster. It also appears that I have ended up with 5 Maran roosters that are mostly docile.. I intend to keep only one rooster with my flock and just wanted to wait and see how things worked out. Well I finished the outside run last week and now have an issue that neither the first flock of pullets or the Easter Egger rooster that are enjoying the outside run now will have nothing to do with the Marans coming out into the run. I put a couple Maran pullets out in the run and the Eater Egger rooster initially courted the Maran pullets but the hens jumped on them and then the rooster joined in. I am going to separate the Easter Egger rooster from the pen, but I don't understand the pullets actions.

Any thoughts or suggestions would be appreciated.

Thank You

Glenn
 

azygous

Enabler
12 Years
Dec 11, 2009
25,875
39,719
1,182
Colorado Rockies
I've been faced with just such a dilemma after discovering I had an unexpected cockerel and he was very aggressive on top of it. The first time it happened, I agonized over what to do. I worked myself into a high emotional state, and finally gritted my teeth and culled the little tyrant.

The second time it happened, having put myself through the emotional wringer before, I refused to spend any time overthinking it, and I snatched the ornery little boy chick and culled him, spending not one second on guilt over it. I instead let myself think about what a nightmare I had avoided by dispatching him before I had time to grow attached to him.

And that is my advice to you. Cull or rehome all the cockerels you don't want. It's actually very possible to tell their temperments at the age they are presently. No need to wait any longer. They aren't going to suddenly change into perfectly wonderful roosters that you would not be able to part with.
 

Sonnygs

Chirping
6 Years
Jun 19, 2015
7
4
62
I've been faced with just such a dilemma after discovering I had an unexpected cockerel and he was very aggressive on top of it. The first time it happened, I agonized over what to do. I worked myself into a high emotional state, and finally gritted my teeth and culled the little tyrant.

The second time it happened, having put myself through the emotional wringer before, I refused to spend any time overthinking it, and I snatched the ornery little boy chick and culled him, spending not one second on guilt over it. I instead let myself think about what a nightmare I had avoided by dispatching him before I had time to grow attached to him.

And that is my advice to you. Cull or rehome all the cockerels you don't want. It's actually very possible to tell their temperments at the age they are presently. No need to wait any longer. They aren't going to suddenly change into perfectly wonderful roosters that you would not be able to part with.
Thank you. I was hoping to wait a little longer, but it is what it is. He will be in a separate pen tomorrow and I am going to see if the hens change temperament.
 

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