New Flock:

Discussion in 'Raising Baby Chicks' started by Iceman23, Jan 31, 2015.

  1. Iceman23

    Iceman23 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    So We Are Getting A Flock In March. My Family And I Are Beginners and Would Like Some Advice To See If Our Breed Are All Good, Friendly To Us And Themselves, Quietish, And Good Enough For Beginners. Here Is Our Coming Flock:
    1 Welsummer
    1 Black Langshan
    1 Blue Cochin
    1 White Plymouth Rock
    1 Speckled sussex
    And My Daughter's Favorite, The Golden Campine.
    We Will Be Using Them For Eggs And Possibly Show Hens. I Would Like to Know Which Chickens To Use For Shows And If They Are All Friendly. Thank You;
    ~Iceman23 and Gigglebox(my daughter)
     
  2. Wyandottes7

    Wyandottes7 Overrun With Chickens

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    Most of the breeds that you chose have a well-deserved reputation for being good beginner chickens and having docile temperaments. Sussex and Cochins in particular tend to be tame. You should gets lots of eggs from your flock, as White Plymouth Rocks especially are very good layers. The one breed that may be a little flighty would be the Golden Campine. However, temperament varies from bird to bird within a breed, and with enough handling, the Campine could end up being the tamest chicken of them all. To read more about these breeds, I suggest taking a look a their reviews in the Breeds section:

    Welsummers: Welsummer
    Langshans: Langshan
    Cochins: Cochin
    Plymouth Rocks: Plymouth Rock
    Speckled Sussex: Sussex
    Golden Campines:Campine

    All purebred chicken breeds recognized by the American Poultry Associaton can be shown. All of the breeds you've chosen are purebred, so in theory you could show every one of them. This is not to say that all of them should be shown, however. Not all birds show the traits they need to be shown. Birds in America are judged according to a standard, which is produced by the American Poultry Association. This Standard of Perfection shows what each breed of chicken should ideally look like. The bird closest to the standard, in a judge's opinion, wins.

    Are you getting these birds from a hatchery, or from a breeder? If you get them from a hatchery, they may not be suitable for showing (this isn't to say that you can't show them, only that you may be dissapointed in the results). Hatcheries tend to focus on quantity, not neccesarily quality of birds. Yes, the birds will look somewhat like the breed they are supposed to be, and will be great pets and layers, but they are not bred to the Standard of Perfection. Hatchery representations of breeds tend to be smaller, with less vibrant color, and sometimes lack important traits. For example, a purebred, show-quality White Plymouth Rock from a breeder will weigh about 8 pounds. This same breed from a hatchery might weigh 5 pounds. If shown, the heavier bird would likely place well, but the hatchery bird would probably be disqualified for being so-called "commericialized". They will still slightly resemble the breed they are supposed to be, but aren't truly what they are supposed to be (according to the Standard).

    If you really want to show birds, it is best to get from a breeder that specifically breeds birds for showing. Hatchery birds don't usually work well as show birds. They may compete well in 4-H shows, but if you ever took one to a larger open poultry show, you may be dissapointed.

    I hope all this information helps. Good luck with your future chicks!
     
    Last edited: Feb 1, 2015
    1 person likes this.
  3. Iceman23

    Iceman23 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    We are getting ours from a permitted professional breeder who has done this for 20... years now. He has a farm in Wyoming with 200 chickens that he breeds and sends them down to use in CO. We get to go up and get our pick of the ckicks. He shows all of his birds and they have championship birds. If you want check out the website: http://www.jtfeeds.com/text/poultry.html

    Also what is a pullet?
     
  4. diamondsmith

    diamondsmith Out Of The Brooder

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    south dakota
    A pullets is a young hen, under the age of one year. Cockreals are a male under the age of one year. After they turn 1, their considered hens and rooster. That's my understanding of it.
     
  5. Iceman23

    Iceman23 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Wow, i thought so.
     
  6. Wyandottes7

    Wyandottes7 Overrun With Chickens

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    Then it sounds like you'll probably be getting some nice birds! Getting birds from a breeder is a great first step in successfully showing poultry. Many people make the mistake of starting with hatchery birds and become dissapointed.

    I see that diamondsmith has already answered your question as to what a pullet is.[​IMG]
     
  7. Iceman23

    Iceman23 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Yes they did. :) I'm just excited to be getting them. I researched how to make them stop eating their eggs. i didnt think of putting golf balls in their nests, when their chicks, and they will learn not to peck it cuz it will hurt... i thought that was pretty cool.
     

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