New from Mableton GA

samaridad

Chirping
May 3, 2015
18
3
52
I'm new have nothing but a plan to get some chickens. Nothing bought nothing built starting from stratch. So any advise is welcome and needed. Just got bees on property and now it's time for Eggs. Oh I mean chickens first before the eggs. Lol thank you ahead of time for sharing your knowledge. Looking for maybe six chickens to start and learn as I go. My experience is limited to watching granny's chickens, when visiting and feeding them and gathering the eggs. Have a great weekend
 

drumstick diva

Still crazy after all these years.
Premium Feather Member
12 Years
Aug 26, 2009
140,843
292,855
2,097
Out to pasture
Welcome to Backyard chickens. The Learning Center is the best place to start. Do you have any idea what breeds you want?
 

Yorkshire Coop

“Limited edition!”
Premium Feather Member
7 Years
Aug 16, 2014
22,882
25,718
1,257
United Kingdom
My Coop
My Coop
Hi :welcome

Glad you could join the flock! Lovely to hear you are planning on starting a chicken adventure. It really is a fantastic hobby and lots of fun. As drumstick said the learning centre is a great place to start for lots of articles on getting started. Here is the getting started section https://www.backyardchickens.com/a/getting-started-raising-chickens
Many articles and lots of info on housing, feeding, picking the right breed for you and keeping them safe and happy and healthy.

Wishing you the very best of luck with your new adventure. Be sure to ask any questions you may have around the forums there really is a section for all things poultry.

Enjoy BYC and all the chicken chat :frow
 

the1913trio

In the Brooder
5 Years
Aug 17, 2014
44
14
41
Denver, Colorado
I would hop on down to the library and/or Amazon and read up on some books first so you know what you need and will be prepared with everything from what breeds you want, how to care for chooks, and the whole sha-bang! There are good sources online too, but there was also a decent amount of wrong info online as well (so take some of the online info with a grain of salt depending).

A couple of good books I liked best out of the many, many books I read were: "Storey's Guide to Raising Chickens" by Gail Damerow, and "The Small-Scale Poultry Flock- An All Natural Approach to Raising Chickens & Other Fowl for Home & Market Growers" by Harvey Ussery.

The books and perusing online should get you up to par with all the basics.

I figured that I would just give you a couple of random tips that I myself have kind of found out with experience that I think are helpful and not necessarily in the books as much/ unique lessons:
1.)It feels like FOREVER waiting the requisite 4 1/2 to 7 months from getting a newly hatched chick till they are old enough to lay. Sometimes a chicken that is supposed to lay well won't. We had an EE that laid for two weeks, then stopped and gradually turned into a rooster (an infertile rooster of course, it is a weird condition that happens if one ovary gets damaged). Our other EE took 7 1/2 months to lay her first egg, and I never knew how delayed laying can be in some breeds till then. Our first to lay (gold sex link) laid eggs at 17 weeks. Chickens only lay at their prime for 2 yrs- ish then have a decrease in productivity usually. Will you cull them at that age, or pay for them as pets? I personally cull and make soup.
2.) Spend lots of time giving treats, handling, and playing with your baby chicks if you want to have more friendly/pet-like chickens. Get them as young as possible or even hatch them if you want them tame & trained best. Spend a lot of time with them the first 3-7 days after hatching especially to get them hooked on their humans (well to have the best odds for this happening at least!).
3.) Chickens all have their own unique personalities, and while you can train them to an extent, they will always have their underlying unique demeanor. If there is a MEAN chicken in the flock picking on the rest of the flock or if there is a SKITTISH chicken terrified to know that humans exist and feed, care for them, etc....GET RID OF THE ROTTEN APPLE! One bad apple spoils the whole batch is true! Your friendliest chicken will be less friendly is there is a skittish, human hating chook in the flock. Once the skittish chicken is gone, the whole flock will suddenly be much more friendly! If a mean chicken is torturing the rest of the flock to no avail, they have to go somewhere else because if I was a chicken and stuck living in a certain coop I wouldn't want to be forced to live with a chicken that beats me up and/or rapes me everyday. Think of the greater good in other words!
4.) Unless you get a sex-linked breed of chicken you always stand about a 10% chance that you will have a rooster even if you bought sexed pullets. The sexers do their best at the hatcheries, but it is hard to tell 1000% for sure. Be prepared with what you will do if you end up with a roo. The general rule is only 1 roo per roughly 8-12 females, and cities usually don't allow roos....so you do the math in your mind about how many roos end up being dinner or need to be culled. Just keep this in mind as many folks are all traumatized when their sweet chicky girl fluff turns into a horny, evil, boy rooster that can only be rehomed if given away for free on craigslist and there were no takers any other way.

Good luck! It sure is fun having chickens!
 
Last edited:

N F C

Moderator
BYC Staff
Premium Feather Member
8 Years
Dec 12, 2013
102,919
467,310
2,172
Wyoming
Good morning and welcome to BYC!

When it comes to selecting the 'right' breed, there are a lot of things to keep in mind (how cold/hot your weather is, how much space you have for a coop/run, if eggs are the #1 priority or if you're more interested in looks, if you want a broody breed to hatch fertile eggs, etc.). There are several chick selectors that can help you figure this all out, here are a couple of links to some:
https://www.backyardchickens.com/a/...cken-guide-to-picking-backyard-chicken-breeds

https://www.mcmurrayhatchery.com/chick_selector.html

http://www.mypetchicken.com/chicken-breeds/which-breed-is-right-for-me.aspx

Also, you may like to touch base with other GA members. They may have some ideas on what works best in your area or local hatcheries:
https://www.backyardchickens.com/t/121387/yo-georgians

Good luck to you, it's fun to raise poultry and very rewarding. Nice to have you join us!
 

sunflour

Flock Master
8 Years
Jan 10, 2013
14,974
7,781
772
Macon,GA
welcome-byc.gif
Welcome from Middle Georgia! So glad you have joined us.

You have already been given links to helpful information.

When I was deciding and planning I bought as many poultry/coop books I could locate. The most helpful to me were Storey's Guide and the Dummies books. But I wasted money on 3 Chicken Coop books, and found the coop/run forums more useful in designing my own.

Please do explore the Learning Center, there are great articles there written by experienced small flock owners.

IMO in your location you can raise pretty much whatever breed or breeds you fancy. Do explore the breed characteristics for egg production and personality traits that meet your expectations. Start with baby chicks, the first year is too much fun to miss out on. Make sure you don't get any straight run chicks. Look for sources that offer sexed baby chicks - they are 90% accurate and in my case they were 100% females. Talk to friends, acquaintances to identify possible rehoming in case you do draw a roo so you can avoid harsh decisions. Or look at sex-linked chicks.

Yo Georgians is the most active GA forum in where am I, where are you.

Make sure you pay attention to size of brooder and coop/run. Everyone agrees go larger than you think.

Feel free to ask questions, we're here to help.
 

samaridad

Chirping
May 3, 2015
18
3
52
B
I would hop on down to the library and/or Amazon and read up on some books first so you know what you need and will be prepared with everything from what breeds you want, how to care for chooks, and the whole sha-bang! There are good sources online too, but there was also a decent amount of wrong info online as well (so take some of the online info with a grain of salt depending).

A couple of good books I liked best out of the many, many books I read were: "Storey's Guide to Raising Chickens" by Gail Damerow, and "The Small-Scale Poultry Flock- An All Natural Approach to Raising Chickens & Other Fowl for Home & Market Growers" by Harvey Ussery.

The books and perusing online should get you up to par with all the basics.

I figured that I would just give you a couple of random tips that I myself have kind of found out with experience that I think are helpful and not necessarily in the books as much/ unique lessons:
1.)It feels like FOREVER waiting the requisite 4 1/2 to 7 months from getting a newly hatched chick till they are old enough to lay. Sometimes a chicken that is supposed to lay well won't. We had an EE that laid for two weeks, then stopped and gradually turned into a rooster (an infertile rooster of course, it is a weird condition that happens if one ovary gets damaged). Our other EE took 7 1/2 months to lay her first egg, and I never knew how delayed laying can be in some breeds till then. Our first to lay (gold sex link) laid eggs at 17 weeks. Chickens only lay at their prime for 2 yrs- ish then have a decrease in productivity usually. Will you cull them at that age, or pay for them as pets? I personally cull and make soup.
2.) Spend lots of time giving treats, handling, and playing with your baby chicks if you want to have more friendly/pet-like chickens. Get them as young as possible or even hatch them if you want them tame & trained best. Spend a lot of time with them the first 3-7 days after hatching especially to get them hooked on their humans (well to have the best odds for this happening at least!).
3.) Chickens all have their own unique personalities, and while you can train them to an extent, they will always have their underlying unique demeanor. If there is a MEAN chicken in the flock picking on the rest of the flock or if there is a SKITTISH chicken terrified to know that humans exist and feed, care for them, etc....GET RID OF THE ROTTEN APPLE! One bad apple spoils the whole batch is true! Your friendliest chicken will be less friendly is there is a skittish, human hating chook in the flock. Once the skittish chicken is gone, the whole flock will suddenly be much more friendly! If a mean chicken is torturing the rest of the flock to no avail, they have to go somewhere else because if I was a chicken and stuck living in a certain coop I wouldn't want to be forced to live with a chicken that beats me up and/or rapes me everyday. Think of the greater good in other words!
4.) Unless you get a sex-linked breed of chicken you always stand about a 10% chance that you will have a rooster even if you bought sexed pullets. The sexers do their best at the hatcheries, but it is hard to tell 1000% for sure. Be prepared with what you will do if you end up with a roo. The general rule is only 1 roo per roughly 8-12 females, and cities usually don't allow roos....so you do the math in your mind about how many roos end up being dinner or need to be culled. Just keep this in mind as many folks are all traumatized when their sweet chicky girl fluff turns into a horny, evil, boy rooster that can only be rehomed if given away for free on craigslist and there were no takers any other way.

Good luck! It sure is fun having chickens!
 

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