New from Pinedale, WY

Discussion in 'New Member Introductions' started by giaduck, Jan 4, 2015.

  1. giaduck

    giaduck New Egg

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    Jan 4, 2015
    Pinedale, WY
    Hello, glad to be a new member to this forum. From the looks of it, there appears to be a great deal of knowledge here. My wife and I are fairly new to this geographical location, only having lived here now since 2012. What we now know for certain is that it gets ridiculously cold during the winter! Having never raised chickens, we nonetheless decided upon and acquired 15 Orpington Chicks (all hens) to raise as layers. We've kept them inside in a small pen, near a wood stove, and a heat lamp, and are happy and healthy. We gave four of them away, and have 11 left. Four more pullets will be given away in the next couple of weeks, leaving us seven to raise. They are now 7 weeks old and ready to move into a coop, which is of my own design. I am putting the final touches on it now, but I have some concerns about keeping them warm in their coop. I took measures to insulate the nesting box and a couple of walls and floor. Outside temps at night here recently have dropped as low as -30 to -40F. I bought an electric radiant panel heater for inside the coop, and I hope some of you may have some suggestions on how I should install it, and transitioning my pullets from inside into the coop? The coop is made primarily of 1/2" plywood, two feet above ground (4X4 legs) and approximately 4'(W)X6'(L)X4'(H), with a long divided nesting box (x4) extended out from one side. The 4' long nesting box can be removed for entry into and cleaning the coop. I can attach a pic, once I figure out how to. Any suggestions would be appreciated. There's not much info out there on caring for and raising chickens in a sub-arctic climate.
     
    Last edited: Jan 4, 2015
  2. matt44644

    matt44644 Chillin' With My Peeps

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  3. BantamLover21

    BantamLover21 Overrun With Chickens

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    [​IMG] Glad you joined us!
     
  4. Wyandottes7

    Wyandottes7 Overrun With Chickens

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    Welcome to BYC! [​IMG]We're glad to have you.
     
  5. TwoCrows

    TwoCrows Show me the way old friend... Staff Member

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    Hello there and welcome to BYC! [​IMG]

    You will need to transition them slowly if your temps are getting down in the sub zero temps. I would start by taking them into a garage or other outdoor building with your heat lamp and start by lowering the heat by 10 degrees each week or 5 degrees every 3 or 4 days. Just keep lowering it until you are down to freezing. This may take a month or more. Once they can tolerate freezing then I would move them to the coop. Use the heat lamp for another week or two and then you can take it away.

    As for a panel heater, I have one in front of my roost bar too and use it when it is going to get below zero. So you might use yours every night if you are seeing -40 degree temps. Here is a pic of mine...

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    Notice the grey panel in the top of the pic, that is my panel heater. I used wood screws and the heads of the screws hold the panel heater to the wall. This thing does not get very hot to the touch so it can go right up on your wooden wall. The sides really have no heat at all on them and it never gets hot enough to burn you or the birds. You might also do as I did here and tack a towel over your roost bar. Warm feet mean warmer birds. Wood gets really cold. I sweep off the bar daily and if it gets too soiled I will lay another towel over top this one. Chickens don't chew on wires, but try to keep the wires up away from the birds.

    Good luck working your chicks out to the coop and we do welcome you to our flock!
     
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  6. drumstick diva

    drumstick diva Still crazy after all these years. Premium Member

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    Welcome to BYC , glad you joined the flock. Had no idea Wyoming got so cold. Brrrr. our town set a state record for the lowest recording temps. one day - 32 in 1985. But NO ONE was venturing out, man, beast, and cars wouldn't start. Wouldn't care to relieve that .
     
  7. lovemy6hens

    lovemy6hens Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Welcome to BYC!
     
  8. giaduck

    giaduck New Egg

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    Jan 4, 2015
    Pinedale, WY
    I just purchased a DeLonghi micathermic flat panel radiator heater at Amazon for about $85. I was going to mount it inside of the coop. I took it out of the box and I am now testing it in my daughter's bedroom. It seems to radiate a good bit of heat, even at the 750W setting. I am a bit concerned about roasting my birds, or burning the coop down. If I install it behind the roosts, at it's lowest thermostat setting, do you thing it would do okay? Your thoughts are appreciated. I mounted a fluorescent light on the ceiling of the coop. Thought the girls would appreciate some light at night. It's on a timer
    Oh, and could you give me some hints on how much ventilation I should provide. The coop is not airtight. It has some cracks between plywood panels, and a couple of gaps on where the nesting box slides in to the side.
     
    Last edited: Jan 4, 2015
  9. TwoCrows

    TwoCrows Show me the way old friend... Staff Member

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    My panel heater I got of Amazon as well and it only has something like 75 watts. I just can't remember. So if yours is too powerful, you might keep it farther away from the. I can touch mine and while it still radiates some good heat, it will not burn you.

    Do some chatting in your state thread on how they keep their birds warm in your area too...https://www.backyardchickens.com/t/699789/wyoming-unite

    And make sure to use good ventilation in your eaves or ceiling. You want all the moisture from the breathing and the pooping to exit your eaves or you will have all kinds of frost bite issues in the cold you have there.

    Good luck and stay warm!!! :)
     
  10. TwoCrows

    TwoCrows Show me the way old friend... Staff Member

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    Oh and 1 square foot of vent space is good ventilation. Keep your roost bar low to the floor like I have mine and let that air fly up at the ceiling! Have vents on two sides of the coop, one set higher than the other. You can work the low side during windy nights to slow down air movement, but never shut all of them off completely. Always leave the high side vents open. The air will tend to enter the low side and go out the high side of the venting. :)
     

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