New girl not acting right

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by austinclarksf, Nov 21, 2013.

  1. austinclarksf

    austinclarksf Chillin' With My Peeps

    118
    0
    81
    Dec 17, 2012
    Hi folks,

    I had a flock of 6, recently added 2 girls. Most are 1 year old, a few are on their second year. Mix of breeds and backgrounds.

    A neighbor gave me one of her first year laying hens a week ago, she could not take all of her flock with her when she was moving. Two days later she gave me another, to keep her refugee company. The two new girls are having a rough time adapting, but have been doing better every day.

    Today I came home from work and found that one of the new girls had not come out into the run. She was sitting on her chosen roosting pole inside the coop. Normally pretty skittish around me, she actually let me approach and pet her. A little concerned, I picked her up and inspected her. Breathing, weight, vent, all seem normal. I placed her on my knee outside the coop, and she hopped off effortlessly and flapped to the ground. She retreated behind a bush, and eventually sat down.

    She would not move voluntarily from that spot. She had her tail down, but breathing was normal and head was alert. One of the other girls made her move, but when normally she puts up a fuss and nearly flies the run, she sheepishly retreated to the coop.

    I have had cases of coccidia and worms in my flock. I treated with antibiotics and eliminated both outbreaks, although not without some loss. We had a rainy spell these past few days, I am concerned she may have contracted coccidia. I know little about it, but from what I've read, it can exist permanently in soil, and can multiply and become an issue in moist conditions.

    I hate antibiotics, but they save lives. I'd also hate to remove this chicken or her sister from the flock, as they are doing well at integrating so far. I am wondering if anyone has had experience with a scenario like mine, or if anyone has advice.

    **note- when my flock had cocci before, there was no blood evident in the feces. Sulmet cured them.
     
  2. ChickenCanoe

    ChickenCanoe Chicken Obsessed

    21,699
    2,652
    466
    Nov 23, 2010
    St. Louis, MO
    Adult hens can have coccidia problems if it is a strain they haven't been exposed to. That said, I highly doubt that is your problem.
    Antibiotics won't do anything for coccidiosis because it is not a bacteria. Barring other symptoms I don't think there is anything wrong other than newly introduced birds.
     
  3. austinclarksf

    austinclarksf Chillin' With My Peeps

    118
    0
    81
    Dec 17, 2012
    Thank you for your prompt reply.

    I treated with Sulmet before I got these new girls. I do not know if they have been exposed or not.

    My 'neighbor' is from a block over, it's probably likely that this new girl was exposed to the same cocci I treated for awhile back, right?

    I hope I am over reacting. I do frequently, but I have lost chickens to what could have been prevented if caught earlier.
     
  4. austinclarksf

    austinclarksf Chillin' With My Peeps

    118
    0
    81
    Dec 17, 2012
    And forgive me- antibiotics was the wrong term. I used conventional medication to treat their cocci and worms. (Sulmet for cocci, Wazine/safeguard goat dewormer for worms)
     
  5. ChickenCanoe

    ChickenCanoe Chicken Obsessed

    21,699
    2,652
    466
    Nov 23, 2010
    St. Louis, MO
    I could easily be making the wrong assumptions. Adult birds are rarely affected by coccidiosis after they've been exposed in early life. I really think she's reacting to flock dynamics. They're the new kids on the block. If you were a teenager forced to live with kids you didn't know, you would probably keep to yourself too.
     
  6. austinclarksf

    austinclarksf Chillin' With My Peeps

    118
    0
    81
    Dec 17, 2012
    I'm really hoping that's the case. She was reacting very differently this past week, hyperactive, paranoid and jumpy. I have noticed that when some hens begin a laying cycle after an interruption (moving, illness, stress, molt, etc) that they become lethargic for a day or two as their bodies re-appropriate protein.

    I'll watch the new girl's sister in the next few days, she's from the same flock and was introduced two days after the girl in question. As of now she's just as paranoid as ever!
     
  7. austinclarksf

    austinclarksf Chillin' With My Peeps

    118
    0
    81
    Dec 17, 2012
    She's still not acting right, but is spending a lot of time in the nesting box. Maybe she's just going broody
     
  8. cafarmgirl

    cafarmgirl Overrun With Chickens

    Your birds on your property can easily have a different strain of coccidia then what may be present on another property, even one nearby. No matter what age a bird is, if it is moved to a new home where chickens are kept it can easily be exposed to a strain of coccidia it is not immune too. Just something to consider and watch out for.
     
  9. austinclarksf

    austinclarksf Chillin' With My Peeps

    118
    0
    81
    Dec 17, 2012
    My new girl is making a turnaround, her tail is still down and she's sluggish but shes active and eating/drinking. She had a very hard time laying an egg, then began to make a change for the better.

    Her comb is still a little purple, but she's going to be fine.
     

BackYard Chickens is proudly sponsored by