New girls dont want to spend nights with old girls.

Discussion in 'Managing Your Flock' started by MEMama3, Aug 8, 2013.

  1. MEMama3

    MEMama3 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    My new chickens are not quite getting along with the old girls like I'd hoped they would. Pecking order has not been established and there is no peace. The older girls are picking on the new girls and the new girls are picking on the young girls. The new girls have taken up residence in the tree in the run (no problems there at all) and the coop (chasing the layers away from the nest boxes causing me to need to make additional boxes in the run).

    The new girls know where the coop is and spend much of the day in there, but they refuse to sleep in there. For the last week I've allowed them to sleep in the tree. Should I allow them to continue this or should I force integration and put them in the coop at night?
     
  2. Percheron chick

    Percheron chick Chillin' With My Peeps

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    You need to get them in the coop at night for safety reasons. You will loose them when they sleep outside. Let the big girls go to bed than pluck the little ones out of the tree and place them in the coop.

    Do you have separate roosting areas in the coop? My 6 month olds just left the kiddie perch and joined the older group this week. They have been in the coop for 4 months but have always slept in a different area.
     
  3. donrae

    donrae Hopelessly Addicted Premium Member

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    How secure is the run? If they're safe from predators--including raccoons, which would mean it's a pretty small tree lol---then I'd just leave them. I've had birds sleep in trees for a few years and not had problems from weather, etc. I did, however, have an excellent farm dog who patrolled and kept predators away.

    My birds who slept in the trees were otherwise part of the flock, but they were hatched here, so no integration issues, sorry.
     
  4. bobbi-j

    bobbi-j Chicken Obsessed

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    I agree with Donrae - if they are safe in their run, leave them. Otherwise, you'll have to figure out how to integrate them. Is there enough room in your run and coop for them to all have enough space? My only experience with chickens roosting in trees didn't end well. We have great horned owls that live in our grove, and at night they would pop the chickens' heads off. They'd only take one or two a night, but it didn't take long for them to wipe out my flock.
     
  5. MEMama3

    MEMama3 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    It is a secure tall hoop run (and yes, it's a little tree with a few fake branches so they feel like their in the tree itself) BUT last night they went in the coop. Of course they are back to not getting along. The new girls are still holding the nest boxes hostage and are still refusing to lay.
     
  6. bobbi-j

    bobbi-j Chicken Obsessed

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    That made me giggle. Give it time, and they will learn to get along. They may never be best buddies, but they will learn to coexist. At least they're making some progress.
     
  7. MEMama3

    MEMama3 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    It's so funny how the dynamics are always changing. I started with 4 young pullets. They got along beautifully, but I discovered one was a roo. I exchanged that one for a POL pullet. She was horrible to them, but eventually they became friends. Then I got 2 laying hens. After the pecking order was established, you could see two obvious flocks when they went to free range. My POL pullet stayed with the young pullets and the layers stayed together. When the POL bird finally laid and then went out to free range she was out with the layers. She's been with them ever since. I guess she needed that egg to join the clique.
     
  8. Kernel Cluck

    Kernel Cluck Chillin' With My Peeps

    Give it some time. It took my 2 hens I added in the winter about 4 weeks to work out the pecking order. As long as everyone is secure at night, no one is broken or bloodied, they will figure it out.
     

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