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New Goat Trouble

Discussion in 'Other Pets & Livestock' started by Duckchick2011, Apr 18, 2011.

  1. Duckchick2011

    Duckchick2011 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Apr 17, 2011
    Louisiana
    I just recently purchased a little pygmy doe to keep my other one(Isabelle) company(she has been my only goat for about two months).
    I was very content with the new little doe, no defects, awesome color, good health everything you can expect from a baby goat. Well, I brought the little one home and introduced her to Isabelle. But instead of the expected reaction of joy and excitement at finally seeing another goat, Isabelle went complete nutso, making this weird crying sound and head butting the new little baby repeatedly until I stepped in. Had either of them been adults I would have thought they were just establishing dominance, maybe that is what she was doing, but I really can't have her injuring the little thing.

    What can I do, I was under the impression that Isabelle would enjoy the company, goats are herd animals, they are supposed to be social, that's why I bought her a buddy. Am I supposed to let them handle this on their own, will it resolve its self. I mean, I expected a little of this but it keeps going on, and Isabelle seems really put out. She came over to me huffing and giving all the impressions of a very distressed goat, the little one almost seems to be handling this better than her.

    I would appreciate any advice. [​IMG]
     
  2. shadowpaints

    shadowpaints Chillin' With My Peeps

    Jun 20, 2009
    Rigby, Idaho
    you should always start intros SLOW. put them in adjoining pens... for a while.. let them get used to each other... never just put them in together right away.

    good luck!
     
  3. glenolam

    glenolam Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Aug 19, 2009
    Canterbury, CT
    How old is Isabelle?

    She could very well be asserting herself over this new kid and since the kid isn't old/big enough to stand their ground you could be asking for trouble. Shadow had good advice. Keep them to where they can see each other but not touch.
     
  4. Duckchick2011

    Duckchick2011 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Apr 17, 2011
    Louisiana
    Isabelle is about 5 months old, the new kid(Camellia) is three.

    I put camellia in the dog(goat) carrier over night. When I came back home from school today my mom had put her back in the pen and the two were just laying down in the shade together chewing their cud like old friends.
    Isabelle still head butts her whenever Camellia tries to get near me...I think she may be jealous of the new baby. I might end up having to keep her in the house for about a week just to get a good bond going.

    I think things are going to work themselves out, but I will definitely take things slower from now on. [​IMG]
     
  5. KYChickenlady

    KYChickenlady Out Of The Brooder

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    Apr 19, 2011
    Yep just another case of a jealous female. Goats are sooooo funnny.
     
  6. StormyMoon

    StormyMoon Chillin' With My Peeps

    May 1, 2010
    Alvarado, TX
    Quote:I have a male and female and the are always head butting each other since she is preggers tho I have them apart.
    But since the day I got them they had been together they head butt each other over a patch of grass, in play , or when we all enter their fenced in area.
    I think head butting is just their way of being goats, this is why a lot of people have their goats disbudded , horns removed while young.
     
  7. Duckchick2011

    Duckchick2011 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Apr 17, 2011
    Louisiana
    Thankfully Isabelle is a naturally polled goat, those first few head butts were not playful, more like pile driving than headbutting really, but the head butts are becoming more playful by the day and Camellia is actually starting to stand her ground a bit. [​IMG]
    All's well in goat world, my babies are going to be friends and I am very thankful for that.

    Thanks for the advice everybody. [​IMG]
     
  8. StormyMoon

    StormyMoon Chillin' With My Peeps

    May 1, 2010
    Alvarado, TX
    Quote:Thats how Malina and Kuzco head butt and believe me I have been on the receiving end a few times not fun my husband has gotten the worst of it cause he has many bruises on his legs and back end. They knock my cats clear across the yard and would also knock each other across the yard but they dig their hooves in the ground and are a lot more sturdy.
    It don't look like fun and games it looks very painful and aggressive, but I have just gotten use to this is them and how they will be.

    They go for the belly, or head on head bangs and the way they knock each other it gives me a headache just watching.
     
  9. llrumsey

    llrumsey Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Apr 12, 2011
    Goats are very strange, they can be friendly to each other or constantly fighting. I have one that is a wether, 1 year old, he lost his mom when he was a baby but I didnt have to bottle feed him because he was older. He is now like a big dog, he has his mom dispacition and is very gentle and loving, everyone picks on him including the chickens and geese, but now he has someone he can push around a 5 day old twin goat, but it wont be much longer before the twin is picking back. Mickey is very loving and wants alot of people attention, he doesnt care if he is with the other goats or not. He is very much a loner.

    His dad on the other had is still a momma's baby even though he is 2 years old, he keeps the other goats away from her, from his feed and water.

    So each goat has their very own personality. Your 2 goats may become the best of friends or just put up with each other.

    Give them time to adjust.

    good luck
     

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