New Hampshire Breed for Exhibition & SOP

Matt1616

Songster
8 Years
Mar 8, 2011
533
148
153
South Alabama
Thank you for starting this thread.

Matt, I would like to see a discussion on where are birds fall short. The tendencies that we are seeing etc.

George...I can tell you what I'm seeing at the shows and what I think are some problems in the breed currently. The one thing that stands out is that a lot of NH large fowl have tails that are way to high. I think overall the New Hamp LF are getting better and better. I would like to see their numbers grow some more but we have come leaps and bounds already. Just as recently as 6-7 years ago New Hamp LF were almost nonexistent in the show room.

Matt
 

gjensen

Crowing
8 Years
Feb 22, 2011
2,965
1,346
313
Midlands, South Carolina
Matt, do you get the feeling the strain is moving forward?

All I am getting a feel from is what I am seeing online.

I see a lot of high tails. I had my fill of those before I started with these, so I do not keep any.

I want to see more depth and width. I am seeing a lot of shallow and cut off birds, more with the males just like I was seeing with my own. I had made a little progress with this, but I do not know what I have growing out yet.
I am not going to put a lot of hope in this bunch, other than identifying something useful. I do hope that I am able to do a small fall batch.

Depth, width, more breast, and length of keel is what I want to see better. And yes, the tails.

I wanted to tame the show boat tails on my birds, particularly with the pullets. The problem is that I like them as hens.
 

Matt1616

Songster
8 Years
Mar 8, 2011
533
148
153
South Alabama
Yes George...I do think the breed is getting better each year. There is more and more people showing them which leads to more people becoming interested in them which leads to more people breeding them. I think in another 5 years you will see them as one of the top American breeds at the shows. They are doing quite well now but I think it will get better.

I believe the majority of the New Hamps out there are crosses and that has contributed to the inconsistency in offspring. My line is starting to stabilize I think. I would like to see more consistency in future generations. They tend to be all over the place as far as type and color.

Matt
 

gjensen

Crowing
8 Years
Feb 22, 2011
2,965
1,346
313
Midlands, South Carolina
Yes George...I do think the breed is getting better each year. There is more and more people showing them which leads to more people becoming interested in them which leads to more people breeding them. I think in another 5 years you will see them as one of the top American breeds at the shows. They are doing quite well now but I think it will get better.

I believe the majority of the New Hamps out there are crosses and that has contributed to the inconsistency in offspring. My line is starting to stabilize I think. I would like to see more consistency in future generations. They tend to be all over the place as far as type and color.

Matt
Well, I hope so. I hope they do not become a hear today, gone tomorrow. It does seam that a lot of people are picking them up. Hopefully there will be a few more like yourself that get a good start and go with them for a length of time.

If I come up with a bird or two, that is pretty good, I would like to show them at a couple shows nearby. I have not hatched anything to brag on. I do think there are a couple people in this State that has them.

I also hope that we will continue to get a sense of good NH type. Color is another conversation all together.

You are right. 8 years ago when I started trying to play around with this breed, I could not find a good bird. These birds coming onto the scene turned things around. Couldn't even find anyone interested in them then. I know that I was tickled when I stumbled across them. I like them as much now as I did then. I will probably never be "happy", but they are a world away from what I started with. I still think that they have as much potential as any breed. It is good to see you doing as well as you are with them. They are good looking birds.
 

desertmarcy

Crowing
9 Years
May 26, 2011
2,435
407
266
Tucson
Well this thread is not very active. Maybe I can get some opinions (Matt?) on these hens. Since there was talk of the tails being too high in the NH hens...here goes, tell me if any of these have tails LOW enough ?? I think they are all too high. Hens are my original pure German birds, hatched 2012.

Blue band:


Black band:


Lavender band:


White band:


Yellow band:
 

Matt1616

Songster
8 Years
Mar 8, 2011
533
148
153
South Alabama
Well this thread is not very active. Maybe I can get some opinions (Matt?) on these hens. Since there was talk of the tails being too high in the NH hens...here goes, tell me if any of these have tails LOW enough ?? I think they are all too high. Hens are my original pure German birds, hatched 2012.

Blue band:


Black band:


Lavender band:


White band:


Yellow band:
Marcia, I would say that "Blue Band" and "Yellow Band" are right about where they need to be. Lavendar Band is to high and the other 2 are borderline.

This is the Schilling picture. This is what I breed for... You be the judge.



Matt
 
Last edited:

LindaB220

Crowing
6 Years
Aug 23, 2013
6,179
884
341
Portland/Vancouver area
Marcia, I would say that "Blue Band" and "Yellow Band" are right about where they need to be. Lavendar Band is to high and the other 2 are borderline.

This is the Schilling picture. This is what I breed for... You be the judge.



Matt
This is good to have a visual of the best . Thanks Matt...
 

gjensen

Crowing
8 Years
Feb 22, 2011
2,965
1,346
313
Midlands, South Carolina
The Schilling prints are the best representations that we have for type and color. When I read the Standard description this is the color and type that I see.

The main points that always stick out to me is . . .They are not birds known for length. They are instead wide birds, with depth. Their capacity comes from their width and depth. The bird in the print has a good strong frame, set on strong legs. A prominent breast, deep keel, and good width. It is not a bird with a lot of length.

NHs were known for their rate of maturity, early fleshing, and speed of feathering. Birds with long and tall frames, generally take more time to fill out. The NH reputation is grounded in the breed's type, and size. The Standard weight acts as an anchor of sorts.
 

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