NEW HEN HELP

Discussion in 'New Member Introductions' started by suburbansilkies, Sep 10, 2016.

  1. suburbansilkies

    suburbansilkies Out Of The Brooder

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    Apr 16, 2016
    England, UK
    Hi guys, Today I got a a new frizzle and silkie for my silkie hen because her 'sister' got taken by a fox and j didn't want her to be alone. My white hen (whom I've had for a while) hasn't had problems previously with frizzles but she keep violently pecking the new black frizzle in the neck. Should I interfere? Is this natural? Is it hurting her? How best should I introduce them? Tips?
     
  2. suburbansilkies

    suburbansilkies Out Of The Brooder

    29
    1
    41
    Apr 16, 2016
    England, UK
    Do I need to quarantine them?
     
  3. drumstick diva

    drumstick diva Still crazy after all these years. Premium Member

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    If they've already been together, it's kind of late to quarantine now. Any chance your frizzle is a cockerel and your hen noticed? Please check out the "Look but don't touch," method of integrating new birds to your flock. Just put that in the search box and it will come up.
     
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  4. redsoxs

    redsoxs Chicken Obsessed

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    Greetings from Kansas and :welcome. Happy you joined us. I agree with the advice Diva gave you. Best of luck! :)
     
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  5. BantamFan4Life

    BantamFan4Life LOOK WHAT YOU MADE ME DO. Premium Member

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    Welcome to BYC! I'm glad you joined us! :)
     
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  6. QueenMisha

    QueenMisha Queen of the Coop

    Welcome to BYC! It's great to have you.

    It's too late for quarantine now, but yes, you should always quarantine. 99 times out of 100 the birds are fine, but it only takes one time to infect your flock wth a contagious disease or a nasty parasite. Introductory methods like "see but don't touch" are ideal, as they reduce aggression and picking. This is done by allowing the birds to range in a nearby area to your existing flock, so they can see each other but are physically separated. This should be done for 1-3 weeks depending on exact age and amounts of birds. Then, barriers should be removed and new birds placed with the existing flock after night has fallen. An additional feeder and waterer should be added to the run. Some bullying is natural in any introduction, and you should only interfere if blood is drawn.
     
    1 person likes this.

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