New hens are joining my flock

Discussion in 'Managing Your Flock' started by LindaSmith, Dec 20, 2014.

  1. LindaSmith

    LindaSmith Out Of The Brooder

    38
    5
    24
    Jul 23, 2014
    Puget Sound, WA
    I have a friend who is moving out of state and has to let go of her 2 hens. They are 3 years old and the Leghorn still lays eggs daily but the RIR not so much since the weather turned cold. I have agreed to take them in to join my 3 that are 7-8 months old. 1 is laying regularly and the other is doing all the actions of getting ready to do so. I know how they are fed, treated and her girls eat the same organic feed that mine does as well as many similar kitchen scraps and treats. They appear to be completely healthy. Other than separating them till they get used to each other, is it still necessary to quarantine them in completely different areas of the yard? I wouldn't think so since I am familiar with them and their upbringing but want to make sure I am not missing something here. We both free range during the day. It would be easy for me to take my tractor coop for the newbies and attach it to the opposite end of the run so they have separate coops but a shared run and free ranging together.
    I need thoughts and ideas on this please.
     
  2. bobbi-j

    bobbi-j Chicken Obsessed

    8,209
    2,186
    421
    Mar 15, 2010
    On the MN prairie.
    If they look healthy, don't have mites or other external parasites, I wouldn't quarantine. You can separate them, but know that there will still be squabbles until they get their pecking order straightened out.
     
    Last edited: Dec 20, 2014
  3. Mrs. K

    Mrs. K Overrun With Chickens

    4,613
    1,161
    356
    Nov 12, 2009
    western South Dakota
    It is a risk, but generally healthy looks healthy. However there are sneaky stuff, and in reality you could be risking your current flock, There are horror stories.

    However, if you have been to your friends, or she to your house, it could be very likely you went to look at the chickens or vice versa, if you were in your chore clothes, or went to your chickens afterwards, they have already been exposed and quarantine is broken.

    I agree with Bobbie, birds in a private flock that have not been exposed to shows, or auctions should be pretty safe.

    Mrs K
     
  4. LindaSmith

    LindaSmith Out Of The Brooder

    38
    5
    24
    Jul 23, 2014
    Puget Sound, WA
    Thank you for the responses thus far. I have been to her house and saw how sweet and friendly her hens were but that was before I had mine. It is partially what encouraged me to have hens. There is no broken quarantine as I have not had any contact her hens since I got mine or with any outside chickens wearing the same clothes or shoes as I've worn in my coop. She doesn't think that she has any mites/fleas or anything else as she has never seen any. I will not be picking them up till the end of January. Would it be out of line or even necessary to request they be treated for parasites prior to joining mine who I believe are mite/parasite free? I would be willing to pay for it. Her hens have not been exposed to anyone else who owns chickens but she does live on a lake and occasionally has ducks on the dock but her hens have no access to the dock area nor the ducks to the hen area. Just trying to cover all bases. I want to make sure I am not opening a can of worms but have wanted to expand my flock.
     
  5. Mrs. K

    Mrs. K Overrun With Chickens

    4,613
    1,161
    356
    Nov 12, 2009
    western South Dakota
    It might be easier to tell her that you are treating yours and would like to treat hers too, at the same time. It is not a bad idea to treat hens regularly for parasites, even if you don't see evidence. And that would start all the hens out in pretty safe.

    mrs k
     
    1 person likes this.

BackYard Chickens is proudly sponsored by