new homesteader

Discussion in 'New Member Introductions' started by midwestchef, Jul 30, 2014.

  1. midwestchef

    midwestchef Out Of The Brooder

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    just got a home in wood county ohio. 10+ acres, pole barn and several animals came with it. My question is, will the animals ever warm up to me? It's about a dozen hens, 3-4 roos, a drake, several barn cats and their kittens, 3 sheep and several pigs, all full grown. Is there any chance they will be friendly or is it a lost cause?
     
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  2. LRH97

    LRH97 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    As far as the chickens and the drake go, don't give up. The more time you spend around them and feeding them, the more they will associate you with food. That's the key: food and time. They will probably start to follow you around the yard soon enough. I've never owned pigs or sheep, so I don't know about their temperaments. My uncle did use to butcher hogs, and he would always tell us how dangerous the huge ones can be. (But, I don't know what kind you have) If the cats have never been around people, I don't know how much luck you'll have with them. They are an independent animal. But, you could have one with a good disposition in the bunch. Or, you could try to catch a kitten or two when they're old enough to raise as pets. Bottom line: Don't give up! Congratulations on your new home, and your animals! [​IMG]
     
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  3. iwiw60

    iwiw60 Overrun With Chickens

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    You say you have 3-4 roosters for a dozen hens? YIKES!!! That's way too many roos. A single rooster would be plenty for your size flock....I'd be culling 2-3 of them for sure.

    As for them being spooky around you, let's face it...YOU are the new kid on the block, not them! [​IMG] If it were me I would just continue to feed them what they've been getting, fresh waterers, etc. Once they see that YOU are the one taking care of them they will get used to seeing you each day. Once that gets accomplished you might try going into their run area and sitting at ground level with them...have some treats like mealworms or sunflower seeds, etc., and just sit there (at first it will seem like forEVER) ... and hold out your hand with goodies in it. The first few times you try this they may not have anything to do with it, but then if you lightly toss a few treats out in front of you eventually one of them will think "hmm, I think I'll try one" .... and there ya go! It just takes a TON of patience and time....wishing you all the very best...keep us updated as to your progress with your new flock!!
     
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  4. Mountain Peeps

    Mountain Peeps Change is inevitable, like the seasons Premium Member

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    Welcome to BYC! Please make yourself at home and we are here to help.

    You should only keep one rooster for every 1-10 hens you own.

    The chickens should warm up to you if you do the right things. Hang out with them, feed them, be quiet around them, talk to them, hold them and just be around them. But don't hold them until they are more comfortable with you. They won't probably seem interested in you and may even act scared of you for the first few days as all this is new to them. Give them time to adjust. If you have patience and don't scare them or hurt the, they'll learn to love you; especially if you always bring a treat!

    Good luck with them and glad you joined!!
     
  5. alldembirds

    alldembirds Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Do you know how they were treated by the previous owner? If they were neglected it could take a little while. If they just havnt been socialized dont worry, be patient.
     
  6. midwestchef

    midwestchef Out Of The Brooder

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    how should i go about culling the roos? also how can i figure out which is the best for breeding and keeping the girls safe?
     
  7. midwestchef

    midwestchef Out Of The Brooder

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    they were treated well from what i can see they all seem to be fat and healthy.However he was a older gentleman and I was told he didn't spend much time on the animals he paid people to feed them and care for them.
     
  8. alldembirds

    alldembirds Chillin' With My Peeps

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    well what kind of chickens do you want in the future? are they all the same kind of rooster? say two roosters are meat type birds and the other is an a breed known for egg laying, you might want to keep the egg laying type so your future chicks would have that in there genes. If they are all the same kind of rooster I would look up the breed standard than cull the ones that dont match criteria. If the rooster is protective yet not aggressive that is good for me. I am sure they will come around if they were treated well just give em some treats. everybody likes treats
     
    Last edited: Jul 30, 2014
  9. midwestchef

    midwestchef Out Of The Brooder

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    I have done some research and they show traits of amerauricanas and RIR but my guess is they are basically mutts. which is fine with me, my belief is nature knows what shes doing. They all come near me and seem curious but scatter if i move towards them and i haven"t seen any aggression towards me or anything else besides each other
     
  10. alldembirds

    alldembirds Chillin' With My Peeps

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    well i would just observe them and get to know them than. If you like one more than the rest and you wish you had more of him you have a keeper. good luck.


    you could just get a couple dozen more hens and not have to get rid of any [​IMG]
     

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