New Member-Spring Hill, Florida

Discussion in 'New Member Introductions' started by yogichick, Jan 23, 2016.

  1. yogichick

    yogichick New Egg

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    Jan 23, 2016
    Hello everyone,

    We are looking to add some Bantam's to our collection of pets. We have never had chickens before and appreciate learning everything we can from those of you who have been through this process. We have read a few books and we are starting to look for a coop with a run. Looking at 4 hens and 1 rooster our county allows four regular size chickens so five Bantams I hope will not be an issue.

    Trying to decide between one day old chicks or pullets (?) any input??

    Thanks
     
  2. GitaBooks

    GitaBooks Overrun With Chickens Premium Member

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    Welcome to BYC! So glad you could join! [​IMG] Its awesome that you are doing research, that's always the best step towards keeping a good flock of chickens.


    Chickens are so much fun, I love them! I have 50, but starting small is certainly a wise thing to do (we're trying to lower the number some). Bantams are a lot of fun and come in so many shapes and colors. Some make better layers, others better pets, others better foragers. If you want pets then cochins or silkies tend to be the best. Sebrights and OEGBs can be really friendly with extra handling and are also beautiful! You can also get miniature versions of the standard breeds, such as Leghorns, Barred Rocks, Rhode Island Reds and Easter Eggers.

    It can be hard to get pullet-versions of bantams, though not impossible. However, if you get day-old chicks you will likely get more roosters then you want and it may be hard to find them a home. However, day-old chicks are easier to tame (and so cute too!) It is personal choice.

    Bantam roosters can be so friendly and cute. However, some breeds like sebrights and OEGBs tend to have noisy, active, and often aggressive roosters that aren't best for a smaller property or smaller flock. The more active breeds need about 8-12 hens, while the calmer breeds (cochins, silkies, mini wyandottes, ect) require fewer hens to keep them happy.

    Feel free to ask any other questions you may have! Best of luck with your future flock!
     
  3. yogichick

    yogichick New Egg

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    Jan 23, 2016
    Wow,

    Thank you so much for the information already! Yes, we have to keep the noise down and the space is smaller. Since I am originally from RI we were hoping to get the Bantam of the Rhode Island Red. Since we have grandchildren 12, 4 and 2 I was hoping to get some that could be handled. We are going to an auction tomorrow to look around.

    My cousin has the Rhode Island Red rooster and the crow is almost nothing, actually it is funny. I imagine not all of them are alike. We want to take our time to be sure we are doing what is best for us and the chickens..I know that probably sounds a little weird.

    Take care and I look forward to future posts.

    yogichick
     
  4. Michael OShay

    Michael OShay Chicken Obsessed

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    Welcome to BYC. Glad you decided to join our flock. Since bantams are generally raised for pets rather than eggs I second GitaBooks recommendation of Silkies or Cochin bantams. Both of these breeds are very friendly, sweet, and calm and make great brooders and mothers (especially Silkies). Personally I prefer purchasing chicks to pullets for the following reasons; they are much more readily available, they can be obtained in a much greater number of breeds giving you more breed selection, and you can start taming them with hand fed treats when they are very young so that they will quickly become good lap pets. Purchased pullets can turn out to be much more high strung and flighty and much harder to tame depending on the conditions in which they were raised. Whatever bantam breeds you decide to get, good luck with your flock.
     
    Last edited: Jan 23, 2016
  5. yogichick

    yogichick New Egg

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    Thank you, Michael

    We were leaning towards chicks for the very reason you mentioned.

    Appreciate the input!! This is a great site.
     
  6. Michael OShay

    Michael OShay Chicken Obsessed

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    You're welcome.
     
  7. drumstick diva

    drumstick diva Still crazy after all these years. Premium Member

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    Out to pasture
    If you get silkie chicks, the biggest problem is they are very difficult to accurately sex before 4-5 mos. of age and sometimes not till they crow or lay eggs. This could mean you end up with cockerels instead of pullets.
     
    1 person likes this.
  8. GitaBooks

    GitaBooks Overrun With Chickens Premium Member

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    Very true. It takes far longer with them then most other breeds.
    However, silkies of older ages are far more readily available and tend to be tamer then older individuals of the other breeders. Even the roosters make quite nice pets. Some people even keep them as indoor pets!
     
    1 person likes this.
  9. BantamFan4Life

    BantamFan4Life LOOK WHAT YOU MADE ME DO. Premium Member

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    Welcome to BYC! I'm glad you joined us! :)
     
    1 person likes this.
  10. NickyKnack

    NickyKnack Love is Silkie soft!

    Hello!
    [​IMG]
    Welcome to BYC and the coop! There's a lot of great peeps here! Feel free to ask lots of questions. But most of all, make yourself at home. I'm so glad you decided to joined the BYC family. I look forward to seeing you around BYC.
     
    1 person likes this.

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