New potbelly pig owner

Discussion in 'Other Pets & Livestock' started by jackhorn01, Aug 18, 2013.

  1. jackhorn01

    jackhorn01 Chillin' With My Peeps

    226
    7
    81
    Aug 10, 2012
    Logansport, Louisiana
    I just got given my first mini potbelly pig. I don't know much about them. I have her food, ( pig pellets ) in a bowl and a dog dish with water in it. I've watched her nosing around the egg and chewing on a couple things. I haven't seen her eat yet though. Are they like dogs in the sense that they will find their food and eat when they are ready or do you have to feed them a certain way? I just have her food in a bowl in a corner in the room where she is, is that good?
     
  2. Madbirdlady

    Madbirdlady New Egg

    6
    0
    7
    Aug 12, 2013
    Hi I had until recently a kune kune pig ( new zeland bush pig ) much bigger than your mini. My pig has piggy pellets in the morning and at night. also fruit and veg.( never feed them onion or citras fruit as these will burn their throat leaving blisters. also tomatos are bad for their joints. They are not greedy and will eat when they won't to. they do need lots of fresh water. pigs tend to knock the water over as they do like mud.

    Hope this helps
     
  3. jackhorn01

    jackhorn01 Chillin' With My Peeps

    226
    7
    81
    Aug 10, 2012
    Logansport, Louisiana
    Yeah, I just haven't seen her eat yet. Today will only be her second day here so maybe thats why. Shes stayin inside the house for now. I have her food in a paper bowl. I tossed a small handful around the bowl on the floor and she foraged around and ate it all. Stood in front of the bowl afterwards but didn't eat out of it. Kinda weird.
     
  4. farmchick897

    farmchick897 Chillin' With My Peeps

    501
    6
    121
    Jun 20, 2010
    Kentucky
    How old is this pig? Can you share a pic? If its a young pig maybe it's not weaned. A pig normally eats everything you give it. :)
     
  5. jackhorn01

    jackhorn01 Chillin' With My Peeps

    226
    7
    81
    Aug 10, 2012
    Logansport, Louisiana
    She is eating now lol. Like a lil pig. I have no clue how old she is. I got her from the neighbor who didn't want her. Shes a cute lil booger though
     
  6. jackhorn01

    jackhorn01 Chillin' With My Peeps

    226
    7
    81
    Aug 10, 2012
    Logansport, Louisiana
    One other question. I have read some on potbelly pigs since I got mine. I didn't have time to research beforehand due to it being kind of a surprise lol. So I see you feed them 1/2 a cup per 25 pounds. Some of the sources say to feed them as much as they want free choice til they get a certain age. Is that the thing to do? Shes not even 25 pounds yet. I can read and read but want some input on people's personal experiences. Should they be all grown up before you start the 1/2 cup thing and feed as much as they want now or start the 1/2 now?
     
  7. Madbirdlady

    Madbirdlady New Egg

    6
    0
    7
    Aug 12, 2013
    Hi really glad she has started to eat. my kune kune used to have one pound of pellets morning and night plus loads of fruit / veg

    My niece has a potbellied (big) so i have copied this for you this is what information she went by. hope it helps.( sorry its very long )

    As a rule, in non-breeding adults feed about 1/2 cup of maintenance food per 25 pounds of the pig's weight (so a 75 pound pig would get 1 1/2 cups of food). The total amount should be divided into 2 meals a day. However, this amount is a guideline and should be adjusted based on the pig's body condition. If the pig is developing rolls of fat around the face and you have a hard time feeling the hip bones, the pig is becoming obese and should be fed less. Conversely, if the pig feels skinny you should feed more. Piglets up to 6 weeks of age can be fed starter ration free choice (as much as they want) but from 6 weeks to 3 months gradually limit the starter food down to about 1 to 1 1/2 cups per day. Nearing 3 months, make the gradual change to the adult diet.

    In addition to the formulated diet, you can feed a good variety of fresh vegetables to make up about 25% of the pig's diet. Foods such as celery, cucumbers, peppers, carrots, potatoes and some greens are good choices (but try to limit the starchy vegetables like potatoes). Some fruits can be feed as well but only in moderation due to the high sugar content. Most pigs love treats like apples, grapes and raisins, but these are good to reserve as treats to be used in training. As a rule, in non-breeding adults feed about 1/2 cup of maintenance food per 25 pounds of the pig's weight (so a 75 pound pig would get 1 1/2 cups of food). The total amount should be divided into 2 meals a day. However, this amount is a guideline and should be adjusted based on the pig's body condition. If the pig is developing rolls of fat around the face and you have a hard time feeling the hip bones, the pig is becoming obese and should be fed less. Conversely, if the pig feels skinny you should feed more. Piglets up to 6 weeks of age can be fed starter ration free choice (as much as they want) but from 6 weeks to 3 months gradually limit the starter food down to about 1 to 1 1/2 cups per day. Nearing 3 months, make the gradual change to the adult diet.

    In addition to the formulated diet, you can feed a good variety of fresh vegetables to make up about 25% of the pig's diet. Foods such as celery, cucumbers, peppers, carrots, potatoes and some greens are good choices (but try to limit the starchy vegetables like potatoes). Some fruits can be feed as well but only in moderation due to the high sugar content. Most pigs love treats like apples, grapes and raisins, but these are good to reserve as treats to be used in training. As a rule, in non-breeding adults feed about 1/2 cup of maintenance food per 25 pounds of the pig's weight (so a 75 pound pig would get 1 1/2 cups of food). The total amount should be divided into 2 meals a day. However, this amount is a guideline and should be adjusted based on the pig's body condition. If the pig is developing rolls of fat around the face and you have a hard time feeling the hip bones, the pig is becoming obese and should be fed less. Conversely, if the pig feels skinny you should feed more. Piglets up to 6 weeks of age can be fed starter ration free choice (as much as they want) but from 6 weeks to 3 months gradually limit the starter food down to about 1 to 1 1/2 cups per day. Nearing 3 months, make the gradual change to the adult diet.

    In addition to the formulated diet, you can feed a good variety of fresh vegetables to make up about 25% of the pig's diet. Foods such as celery, cucumbers, peppers, carrots, potatoes and some greens are good choices (but try to limit the starchy vegetables like potatoes). Some fruits can be feed as well but only in moderation due to the high sugar content. Most pigs love treats like apples, grapes and raisins, but these are good to reserve as treats to be used in training. As a rule, in non-breeding adults feed about 1/2 cup of maintenance food per 25 pounds of the pig's weight (so a 75 pound pig would get 1 1/2 cups of food). The total amount should be divided into 2 meals a day. However, this amount is a guideline and should be adjusted based on the pig's body condition. If the pig is developing rolls of fat around the face and you have a hard time feeling the hip bones, the pig is becoming obese and should be fed less. Conversely, if the pig feels skinny you should feed more. Piglets up to 6 weeks of age can be fed starter ration free choice (as much as they want) but from 6 weeks to 3 months gradually limit the starter food down to about 1 to 1 1/2 cups per day. Nearing 3 months, make the gradual change to the adult diet.

    In addition to the formulated diet, you can feed a good variety of fresh vegetables to make up about 25% of the pig's diet. Foods such as celery, cucumbers, peppers, carrots, potatoes and some greens are good choices (but try to limit the starchy vegetables like potatoes). Some fruits can be feed as well but only in moderation due to the high sugar content. Most pigs love treats like apples, grapes and raisins, but these are good to reserve as treats to be used in training. As a rule, in non-breeding adults feed about 1/2 cup of maintenance food per 25 pounds of the pig's weight (so a 75 pound pig would get 1 1/2 cups of food). The total amount should be divided into 2 meals a day. However, this amount is a guideline and should be adjusted based on the pig's body condition. If the pig is developing rolls of fat around the face and you have a hard time feeling the hip bones, the pig is becoming obese and should be fed less. Conversely, if the pig feels skinny you should feed more. Piglets up to 6 weeks of age can be fed starter ration free choice (as much as they want) but from 6 weeks to 3 months gradually limit the starter food down to about 1 to 1 1/2 cups per day. Nearing 3 months, make the gradual change to the adult diet.

    In addition to the formulated diet, you can feed a good variety of fresh vegetables to make up about 25% of the pig's diet. Foods such as celery, cucumbers, peppers, carrots, potatoes and some greens are good choices (but try to limit the starchy vegetables like potatoes). Some fruits can be feed as well but only in moderation due to the high sugar content. Most pigs love treats like apples, grapes and raisins, but these are good to reserve as treats to be used in training.
     
  8. Brendalee5

    Brendalee5 Out Of The Brooder

    10
    0
    23
    Apr 1, 2015
    Creston, Iowa
    My pig is now a year old but I started off by feeding her a half cup of pellets in morning and at bedtime and fruit for snacks the time a day and always water all day and night.
     
  9. horsegirl10

    horsegirl10 Out Of The Brooder

    55
    1
    41
    Feb 28, 2015
    On a Farm
    I'm really excited about MIGHT getting a mini potbelly PIGGY[​IMG]
     

BackYard Chickens is proudly sponsored by