New pullets in coop!

Discussion in 'Where am I? Where are you!' started by Marcy54, Aug 8, 2014.

  1. Marcy54

    Marcy54 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Aug 4, 2014
    Shapleigh, ME
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    Okay, so I went on Thursday morning to Poland to pick up the last of their wyandotte pullets. There were three silver laced and six golden laced. I got them for $10.00 each. All looked healthy, and are supposed to be hens. According to the grower, they should be ready to lay in mid September. I am hoping to free range them, but we are kind of wondering if we should free range when we are around, which is most of the time. Anyhow, I read that we should keep them in the coop for a few days to acclimate, they seem content enough. The coop should be big enough for ten. I have been checking them off and on today, they are walking around, eating, drinking and pooping. The poop looks good, not runny or anything.
     
  2. The Yakima Kid

    The Yakima Kid Cirque des Poulets

    You can keep them in a run attached to the coop. That way they will learn where they need to go to sleep at night. As they approach POL, you can open up the nest boxes and put nest eggs in there so they will learn good laying habits. Don't be surprised if from time to time more than one tries to lay in the same nest at the same time - they are communal nesters.
     
  3. Marcy54

    Marcy54 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Aug 4, 2014
    Shapleigh, ME
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    So here is the coop, would you make the run start at the top of the coop since the door would open into the run and enclose the underneath part and well. Then have the run go out a few feet? We are on 2 1/2 acres so space is not a problem.
     
    Last edited: Aug 8, 2014
  4. The Yakima Kid

    The Yakima Kid Cirque des Poulets

    Or I'd build the run as an enclosure, not attached to the coop, but with the coop inside it. A number of people have used chain link fencing for runs, making it predator proof with either digging barrier wire planted below it, or electric fencing "scare wires" top and bottom. Putting a top of fencing over it helps stop climbers that make it past the scare wires or just fly in.
     

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