New roo OK by himself?

Discussion in 'Managing Your Flock' started by travlin' farmgirl, Oct 31, 2011.

  1. travlin' farmgirl

    travlin' farmgirl New Egg

    3
    0
    7
    Apr 28, 2010
    Hi all!

    My girls have been roo-less for several months, my first, and only, rooster died last winter, he was from my very first batch of babies and was 10 when he died. My neighbor hatched out a couple little guys this summer and I picked one up last night. I didn't realize until I got there how much younger/smaller he is than my girls. My neighbors flock is all full sized layers, so he just needs more time. I picked him up and put him in with my girls last night. He walked right out of the carrier and, after checking out the coop, hopped right up on the roost. I was nervous about his size, but hopped his "boy-ness" would help the girls accept him.

    This morning the girls were not being particularly hospitable, OK, they were ganging up on the little dude, all 10 of them. I've moved him to another coop/run that I use for broodies, newbies, etc... They can all see each other, but I'm a little worried about him being all alone over there. Is he OK on his own? Should I put one or two of my younger hens who just started laying with him? The only other thing I can think to do is go get his brother from my neighbor, but then I have one more roo than I really want. Can 2 Roos share 10 hens, or will it turn into fight?

    My old roo was, god rest his soul, was a total jerk. I'm really hoping this new one is as docile as his father is over at my neighbors farm, and don't want to do anything to encourage aggressive behavior. I guess I don't know what's worse, getting beat up by the girls, being separated from everyone else, or testosterone issues a little ways down the road.

    Any advice would be greatly appreciated!
     
  2. aoxa

    aoxa Overrun With Chickens

    He'll be fine! Why wouldn't he be? He can see the girls. He can talk to the girls. He just can't harass the girls (or vice versa). Or you could just let them work out the issues themselves.
     

BackYard Chickens is proudly sponsored by