New Roof planned..

Discussion in 'Coop & Run - Design, Construction, & Maintenance' started by mendozer, Jun 2, 2012.

  1. mendozer

    mendozer Songster

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    For reference this is my current roof https://www.backyardchickens.com/t/562151/new-coop-build

    It's starting to sag, leaks in the middles, and oh yeah it's heavy as ****** and I'm moving so this won't do. I made the coop itself modular so they come apart in panels. However, I've been wanting a new roof for a while and this move will force me to complete it.
    I'm thinking corrugated plastic over a wooden frame. That way it's lightweight and the overlapping corrugated material will keep out moisture. Because of my coop's slant, the roof will slant front to back, so I will have to layer the corrugated pieces with channels facing the back.

    lowes used to have a fiberglass roofing panel but I can't find it anymore, which bums me out b/c it had a long warranty. So my options are PVC or polycarbonate seen here( Lowes plastic by Tuftex or Home depot polycarbonate )

    I plan on mounting it to my frame using these. These will allow me to slide the 2x4 (was going to use furring strips, but braces don't come that small) into the brace so the entire roof can be lifted out if need be. The 2x4s will be mitered to be flush with the frame wood (I'll have to figure out the angle...?) Looks by the measurements that I'll need 5 sets of 2x4s.

    I have a rough sketchup here showing the lengths of the available wood to attach based on my frame's top pieces. The panels will be cut into 26" W x 48" L pieces and there will be four (from two panels) overlapping to make an overall 48" L x 104"(or less) roof for my 4'x8' coop. The overlapping should (in my book) keep out moisture and those joints are where I'll screw down to the 2x4 pieces.

    [​IMG]
    For ease, I was going to slide the 2x4s into the joists then screw the panel pieces down onto them. I already have a triangular piece on the sides for the weird triangle left from the front being higher than the back. Also, the small wavy gap between the panel and the wood will provide minor ventilation. I already have plenty of other ventilation, so that's not a worry.

    My questions are:
    1. will it be strong enough so long as I keep 2x4 framework under the edges of each panel?
    2. Will it be waterproof? I also plan on putting silicone caulking at the seam on the bottom part of the roof for each segment joint.
    3. Am i thinking about this framework the right way with corrugated roofing? never done it before?
    4. Will plastic be ok? (polycarbonate has a 10 yr warranty)
    5. Will it be awesome?



    Thanks
     
  2. Jakoda

    Jakoda Songster

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  3. mendozer

    mendozer Songster

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    i would put plywood down for support but that makes it heavy for when I potentially have to move again.
     
  4. JML72

    JML72 In the Brooder

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    Mar 31, 2012
    I'm by far no expert, but I just put up polycarbonate two days ago. So I'll tell you my experience:
    1: a simple 2x4 frame under the edges of the panels will not support them in the middle. They're pretty flexible and will bow down in between the edges. The brochure recommends purlins between 24" and 30" apart.
    2: Yup. I put mine up with a one-ridge overhang and no silicone (put it up, it got dark, one Hell of a rainstorm the next day) and it didn't leak yet. The key word being "yet." Use the recommended screw fasteners just to be sure.
    3: See above for #1.
    4: I used the polycarbonate from HD. Heard from folks on here and elsewhere that the PVC gives up the ghost pretty easily, so I decided to spend a couple of bucks more and get the higher-end stuff.
    5: As awesome as you are I'm sure.

    Another thing to think about - if you're worried about predators I've seen where critters can chew a hole through or chew to pry up a section of the panel so they can access the area. I covered the run in hardware cloth and then put the panels on over them - that took care of the need for purlins as well (the wire acts as a support for the top between the roof joists).

    Good luck!
     
  5. fillmore

    fillmore In the Brooder

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    May 25, 2012
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    roof framing parallel to the corrugation wont be sufficient, plastic is too flimsy. use 1x strips @ ~2' o.c. across the roof framing and it should be rigid enough. caulk the seams with a continuous bead and also seal all screw penetrations and you should be good. awesomeness assured.
     
  6. mendozer

    mendozer Songster

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    well because my grooves will run front to back (rather than side to side) those 2x4s are technically the purlins. And I could definitely put 24" apart since the sections will only be 26" wide.

    fillmore, 2" strips at OC? Translate please. You mean use furring strips to go horizontal on top of my vertical 2x4s? Then just screw down into the thin strips which lay on top the 2x4?
     
  7. KDK1

    KDK1 Songster

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    Your purlins need to run perpendicular to the corrugation of the polycarb. Roof trusses run front to back... purlins run side to side... corrugated panels run front to back.
    Your purlins can be 2x2, 1x3 or 1x4
     
    Last edited: Jun 3, 2012
  8. mendozer

    mendozer Songster

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    what do the panels screw down to? trusses or purlins? Because my purlins will sit higher than my trusses if im stacking the 1" on the 2x4
     
  9. fillmore

    fillmore In the Brooder

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    May 25, 2012
    pnw
    wood 1x4s @ 2 foot on center spacing across the 2x framing members would be more than sufficient, and provide plenty of backing to screw down plastic panels and maintain rigidity.
     
  10. KDK1

    KDK1 Songster

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    They attach to the purlins which are attached to the trusses.
     

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