New to BYC and chickens...Indiana

Discussion in 'New Member Introductions' started by WestIndy, Jan 27, 2014.

  1. WestIndy

    WestIndy Out Of The Brooder

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    Hello all! Wanted to say what a great resource this site has been to me as I've 'hatched' my idea to have backyard chickens. From coops, to feed, to DLM and the rest, it's been a gluttony of information! I'm going to build my coop as soon as these frigid temps allow me to get outside. Can't decide on whether to start with chicks or pullets? Looking for egg production only, meat is not the intention with my flock.

    Anyway, look forward to learning more as I go and hopefully can add insight to future conversations!
     
  2. Wyandottes7

    Wyandottes7 Overrun With Chickens

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    Welcome to BYC! [​IMG]We're glad to have you.

    Whether to get chicks or started pullets is a hard question to answer, and is a matter of personal choice. If you get chicks, you can watch them grow up (and baby chicks are very cute). Chicks that you handle right from the start will become tamer than started pullets, usually. Also, chicks are less expensive, costing a few dollars each. However, you'll put more feed into them before they start laying. There's always the chance that you'll get a rooster or two even if you order pullet chicks. And, you'll have to wait about 5-7 months before you start getting eggs.

    Started pullets allow you to start getting eggs within a few weeks to a few months after getting them. However, they may not become as friendly to you as chicks would be. Started pullets also have the possiblity of carrying disease into your flock, as they have been alive longer and therefore may have been exposed to disease.
     
  3. BantamLover21

    BantamLover21 Overrun With Chickens

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    [​IMG] Glad you joined us! It is your decision as to whether to get chicks or started pullets; there are benefits and drawbacks to each. Chicks are inexpensive, adorable, and easier to create a bond with as they grow. But they require more feed, may be susceptible to disease, and won't start giving you eggs for a while. On the other hand, pullets are at a hardier age, and will start laying soon. However, they can introduce disease into your flock and will not be quite as used to human attention.
     
  4. TwoCrows

    TwoCrows Show me the way old friend... Staff Member

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    Which ever you choose, chicks or pullets, you might want to check out our breeds section here on BYC for some info on the different breeds and what people are saying about them...

    https://www.backyardchickens.com/products/category/chicken-breeds

    I am a fan of starting with chicks. Not only are they fun to watch grow, but they bond with you better and are easier to work with as adults.

    Enjoy all your poultry adventures!
     
  5. WestIndy

    WestIndy Out Of The Brooder

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    Jan 25, 2014
    Thanks for the warm welcome and advice. I'm starting small so maybe 6-7 chickens at the beginning. Thinking of getting a mixture of Buff Orphington, RIR, Easter Eggers or Barred Rock. Also have Americaunas for sale locally so I might check those out too.
     
  6. WestIndy

    WestIndy Out Of The Brooder

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    Quick question regarding feed> Walking through the local store I see feed with 16%crumble, 20%crumble etc. What do they mean by that? Is that the percentage of the food that has been crumbled into a very fine consistency? Thanks!
     
  7. TwoCrows

    TwoCrows Show me the way old friend... Staff Member

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    The percents you are seeing in the feeds is the protein percentages. Growing babies need about 18% or 20% protein for good growth. Adult layers only need about 16% protein. Layer feed has extra calcium for hard egg shells, the chick starter has only a small amount. If you go with the chicks, you need to give them chick starter with around 18% or 20% protein. If you get started pullets, and they are laying, you will need layer feed with about 16% protein. Do not feed layer feed to birds that are not yet laying. Hope this helps. :)
     
  8. WestIndy

    WestIndy Out Of The Brooder

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    Jan 25, 2014
    Helps a ton! Thanks for the input.
     
  9. chick rookie

    chick rookie Chillin' With My Peeps

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    wait now I'm confused...... I have hens that are not laying, and they eat the same layer feed as the hens that are laying, I have no place to separate them, am I messing them up? don't have any ideal how I can feed separately?
     

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