New to BYC/Winterizing

Discussion in 'Coop & Run - Design, Construction, & Maintenance' started by NannaD'sCrazyCoop, Sep 12, 2011.

  1. NannaD'sCrazyCoop

    NannaD'sCrazyCoop Out Of The Brooder

    I've jumped in with both feet - got the chicken bug fast. I have 6 RIR/2 Roos and 4 Hens (ready to nest) and 9 (Think have 1 roo/8 Hens) Olive Eggers (what I've been told...will post pics and questions about that later/different forum). I'm trying to get my modified shed/coop ready for winter. My lovelies have free ranged all summer and have a summer coop they've enjoy and allowed me to "learn-along-the-way"...however, winter is much more serious a matter for me; especially them. Winters are VERY unpredictable here (Oklahoma). Last winter we had a horrible blizzard. I am modifing my shed into a winter coop. There are no windows, the door faces West, the roof is not sealed - the rafters 'lift' the roof (sorry, not sure on terminology) which puts the wind NORTH/SOUTH flow through the roof. I'm insulating the walls, but not sure what to do about the roof, ventilation and lack of natural light. I've thought about sealing and insultaing the rafters and putting vents on the EAST/WEST up high for ventilation. ANY help would be GREATLY appreciated! [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Sep 12, 2011
  2. HallFamilyFarm

    HallFamilyFarm PA ETL#195

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    [​IMG] neighbor. Grew up near Checotah, Oklahoma. natural sunlight is best. Use ceiling light panels to make windows. Or just install a window. Plastic sheeting is nice. When living in Oklahoma we would cover all runs with tarps on the top and clear plastic sheeting in the sides.

    Where in Oklahoma are you?
     
  3. peepblessed

    peepblessed Chillin' With My Peeps

    Welcome to BYC! We don't get blizzards here but it does get very cold in the mountains where we live. Blocking drafts that will blow where the chickens roost is important. High ventilation is good and of course you want everything dry. [​IMG]
     
  4. NannaD'sCrazyCoop

    NannaD'sCrazyCoop Out Of The Brooder

    Jim -

    I'm orig from OKC - Spent last 7 years in Moore - Recently moved to Norman countryside...

    Peeps -

    Thanks for the welcome...

    Thank you both for the advice - any idea's about the Roof? Is the North/South air flow going to be a problem?
     
  5. NannaD'sCrazyCoop

    NannaD'sCrazyCoop Out Of The Brooder

    Fireguy56/Erik -

    I've only recently able to add pics. So here is my soon-to-be "craZy cOOp" (for Winter)

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    The first view is from the SW...
    The second view is from the North...
    The third is from inside looking up that the roofline of the North wall...

    My fear is that the North/South air flow is going to be too much and possibly allow rain/snow when we get wind gusts - I was thinking of adding face boards to cut off some of that wind and elimate the possibility of moisture getting inside. Or I can block them completely and just add East/West vent up top. I am adding two windows on the South (hopefully this weekend).

    Building dementions are: 8wX16dX8h

    I am only going to be using up to 6 ft then I'm creating a small loft area at the back (East)...this will leave 2 ft for air flow up top...

    Pray all of this makes sense...What are your thoughts?
     
  6. NannaD'sCrazyCoop

    NannaD'sCrazyCoop Out Of The Brooder

    Please keep in mind - this area is under construction and will be cleaned up [​IMG]
     
  7. LiLRedCV

    LiLRedCV Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Impressive!

    Former Enid-ite here. [​IMG] Now living in the Pacific NW.

    Since you don't have windows for natural light, you could add a light source on a timer to turn it on/off automatically for the days you can't make it out to the coop due to blizzard conditions or just for any day between now and next spring when they'll be outside more often - use an outdoor extension cord from the nearest outdoor electrical source. You can set the timer to roughly summer sunrise and summer sunset for maximum benefit. There's much debate about the pros and cons of lighting a coop. Some feel it disrupts the natural laying cycle of the hens.

    If you're really worried about keeping it warm inside, you can most definitely do as previously suggested with the tarps and wrap on the exterior. That helps considerably! Especially if you can't put in insulation and walls to cover it properly to keep the girls from pecking at it.

    You can also use the ultra red lights (available at most feed or pet stores) or the ceramic bulbs and hang them from the rafters to just above their roosting heights. They won't keep your girls awake at all hours of the night 'cuz they're not a light source - just a heat source. Again, there's some debate as to whether or not to heat the coops - some believe it will take away the chickens ability to deal with colder weather if and/or when the power goes out during a very cold storm.

    Fair warning on the electrical tho'! Some have lost their coops and flocks due to electrical fires, so it's best to check the lines for cuts/fraying.

    Your roof looks great with the reinforcement you have - good for a bearing up on a good snow day! The overhangs on the North and South walls look good too. Far enough out to keep out the inclement weather and enough to keep it ventilated. I know how bad those OK winds can get tho'! (I do NOT miss those!!!) You can try to put up temporary covers to block some of that which can be easily removed for summer time to let the air circulate.

    These are just some quick fix ideas that could possibly get you through 'til next spring when you have a bit more time to work out the logistics of changes.
     
    Last edited: Sep 14, 2011
  8. NannaD'sCrazyCoop

    NannaD'sCrazyCoop Out Of The Brooder

    Quote:Thank You for your kind words and wonderful advice...it helps to understand the climate here. People have a huge misunderstanding about that in particular. I wasn't planning on adding a heat source though...I'm just going to watch them carefully to see how they do. I am going to add lights to extend daylight hours - but that's the extent of the lighting. We have electric ran to the building - my son is an electrician, so he's going to give it a good inspection and make any changes (so very blessed to have him!).

    How long since you've transplanted? I would love to explore living in other areas, but my husbands job keeps him here (TAFB).
     
  9. LiLRedCV

    LiLRedCV Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Land of the Rain
    NannaD'sCrazyCoop :

    Thank You for your kind words and wonderful advice...it helps to understand the climate here. People have a huge misunderstanding about that in particular. I wasn't planning on adding a heat source though...I'm just going to watch them carefully to see how they do. I am going to add lights to extend daylight hours - but that's the extent of the lighting. We have electric ran to the building - my son is an electrician, so he's going to give it a good inspection and make any changes (so very blessed to have him!).

    How long since you've transplanted? I would love to explore living in other areas, but my husbands job keeps him here (TAFB).

    You're so lucky to have an electrician by trade in the family! [​IMG] My hubby's mighty talented in that dept. - he has his degree in electrical engineering, but he's former Active Duty AF and now a USAFR C-17 pilot for his career. He's not current on electrical licensing tho', so he's not supposed to do the electrical stuff. [​IMG] We're not lighting or heating our coops as the winter's tend to be relatively mild by OK comparison, but we are using clear corrugated panels for the South side of the roof for natural lighting.

    This is the longest I've lived anywhere in my life! I grew up an "Army brat" (was born at Ft. Sill) and we moved on average every 3yrs when when I was a child. Due to family living in OK, we always went there for family vacations to visit them tho'. When I was 14yrs old, I went to live with my grandparents in a little BFE town just outside of Enid - even left the area in mid-'91 to move to AZ, then moved back to OK when my grandfather passed away so I could help my grandma.

    I've been a transplant to the Pacific NW since mid-1997, but I left Enid once and for all back in 1995. Still have family all over OK and mainly in Garfield County tho' and go back to visit at least once a year! [​IMG] I got a promotion to management with the loan company I worked for and was transferred to Reno, NV summer '95... then moved to AZ... and then TX... before finally moving to WA.

    I'm here 'cuz I met hubby in early '97, we clicked, and I decided to give "us" a chance. We've been together ever since! [​IMG] The relationships a great fit for us, but we're still debating this weather up here! LOL But, to be honest, I'd rather live here than in OK. It's extremely rare for us to have those wicked winds, extreme temps, or tornadoes to deal with. [​IMG]
     
  10. mtnhens4

    mtnhens4 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I recently ran across this thread for the Woods stlye coop wit a lot of really great info about what you need to keep a healthy flock during the winter. It's on the first page of Coop & Run or just search for "Woods stlye coop" and you'll be amazed at what you find. Hope this helps, I'm in WNC so I don't know what your winters are like but I think that everyone I know around the country had a bad winter last year so it's good to be prepared.
     

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