New to chickens confirming sex and breeds?

Discussion in 'What Breed Or Gender is This?' started by rvaughan, Oct 6, 2013.

  1. rvaughan

    rvaughan New Egg

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    I was told i have two golden sex links, 2 Easter Eggers, 1 white leg horn and 1 Black australorp. they are supposed to be 24 weeks old. i have been getting 4 eggs a day for the last 2 or so weeks. 2 have been brown eggs fairly large, 1 med to lg white egg and the other looks whit but has a tannish or pink tint to the shell. any help identifying the breeds and sex would be appreciated.

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    Last edited: Oct 6, 2013
  2. Kelsie2290

    Kelsie2290 True BYC Addict Premium Member

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    I'm seeing the same breeds you said. While EEs can lay brown eggs, they probably are not laying quite yet, looking at their combs. Being mixes EEs can vary quite a bit on when they start laying and their production. The white egg is the leghorn, the two sexlinks are the bigger darker eggs and the pinkish egg is the lorp probably.
     
  3. chooks4life

    chooks4life Overrun With Chickens

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    Not sure as the photos are too blurry to see any specific male feathering, but the Leghorn perhaps could be a male. The golden sheen of the neck and a few other things about it seem more male than female to me, which is strange since you mention you're getting one large white egg which I would suspect from a Leghorn.

    The rest all look female, and from what limited info I have on Easter Eggers and Golden Sex Links, I think they're purebred or close enough. I'm no expert on breeds.

    Are you sure about the ages? Some seem like they're in their first moult already. Either that or some of them are feather pickers.

    The black Australorp seems a little strange, but I've seen a very wide variance in types of birds sold as B.Orps. So she could be purebred for all I know. However the Leghorn is not. It seems slightly bearded and the wing in the bottom photo has some dark feathering on it. If you can get a sharp pic of the Leghorn, I can tell you whether it's male or female, I reckon. The Golden Sex Link on the left in the middle pic may also be male.

    Best wishes.
     
    Last edited: Oct 6, 2013
  4. rvaughan

    rvaughan New Egg

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    i bought all of them back the end of april and the girl said they were 2 weeks old. there is definitely feather pickers in the flock. One of the Easter Egger's right above its tail has a bare spot and feathers all over the coop. here is some more picture of the leghorn.

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  5. chooks4life

    chooks4life Overrun With Chickens

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    What an ambiguous bird, lol! I am still leaning towards male, especially with those curled feathers near the tail, but a lot of high production layers have high testosterone levels and may mate with other females, grow spurs, and sometimes have more male feathering types. So it's not too easy to say. Either way, it's not purebred. But depending on diet, hidden colors may show up in birds.

    I once bought two 2-year-old Leghorn hens, two-egg-a-day layers, which were pure white.... White feathers, beak, pale eyes, white legs, white eggs. After having them on my normal chook diet for a year, everything changed. This was due to the kelp granules I use as a multi-vit and mineral source. They got intensely yellow beaks and legs, laid pink/brownish eggs, had black and red spots and streaks in their feathers and dirty/smutty coloring, one got red irises and the other yellow irises, and one got a black streak down her beak. These colors would have remained hidden for the rest of their lives if I'd not put them on kelp. Animals and humans don't express their true genotype when their diets are lacking in any way.

    It could be that this Leghorn was standard for looking purebred, but something in your feed has supplied the nutrience levels needed for it to express true genotype in its phenotype. Certainly they're shiny and sleek enough. Sorry I can't definitively say "male" or "female", lol! But no doubt you will know soon enough. Maybe someone else can help.

    All the best.
     
  6. Kelsie2290

    Kelsie2290 True BYC Addict Premium Member

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    That sure looks like a commercial White Leghorn pullet, floppy comb and all. Commercial White Leghorns are not show birds, they are bred for egg production and they don't care if it meets the sop.
     
  7. donrae

    donrae Hopelessly Addicted Premium Member

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    Those birds are all female, and the breeds you were told (how refreshing!)

    The sex links are reddish gold, thus they are female. Male sex links are white/silver based.

    The leghorn is female. The floppy comb is pretty much a female trait, and at 24 weeks you'd see much, much more rooster characteristics. Plus, it's the only white egg layer you've got, and you're getting white eggs.

    I can't see the ee combs well, but in the pic with the two on the roost, the one on the right looks to maybe have a straight comb. That would lessen her chances of laying a blue or green egg, she could then be your light tinted egg layer.

    How much space do you have for these birds? The feather picking is often a sign of overcrowding........
     
  8. rvaughan

    rvaughan New Egg

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  9. rvaughan

    rvaughan New Egg

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    i believe there is 44 or 48 sq feet inside space
     
  10. Wyandottes7

    Wyandottes7 Overrun With Chickens

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    All of your chickens appear to be pullets, and the correct breeds. Nice flock!
     

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