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NEW TO CHICKENS. I NEED HELP.

Discussion in 'Incubating & Hatching Eggs' started by wtouvell, Mar 11, 2016.

  1. wtouvell

    wtouvell Just Hatched

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    How do I know how many eggs to save in case my hen goes broody. I have two breeds and I only want to hatch one. So how do I know how many to save to hatch and how many to eat?
     
  2. AmyLynn2374

    AmyLynn2374 Humidity Queen

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    How many do you want to hatch out? Though if you don't have a broody, saving eggs is kind of pointless. Eggs viability after 10-14 days decreases significantly and there's no telling when a hen will go broody. I'd wait until she's actually broody and then collect your eggs. If she's a good size broody she should be able to cover a good 8 or more comfortably.
     
  3. kuchchicks

    kuchchicks Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I agree. And depending on what breed she is you could be waiting a long time. Some breeds go broody quite frequently, others not so much. Some of my chickens have never gone broody. My silkies on the other hand I think are broody more than they are not - someone is always sitting on eggs.

    I guess the question is do you want to wait til she goes broody because you want the experience of your hen raising babies? Or do you not feel comfortable or do not want to use a bator? Having a broody sit on eggs and then raise the babies is a wonderful experience. If that is what you are wanting to do I completely understand. On the other hand, hatching eggs out yourself is amazing! Especially when they are eggs from your own chickens. I'm not saying that hatching eggs that you get from someone is not fun - it is, but there is something really cool about the ones that come from your own girls!
     
  4. FridayYet

    FridayYet Innocent Bystander

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    You can always write the date on them and store them in an egg carton on the counter. Once you have a dozen, start eating the oldest and replacing them with the newest. Then when your hen goes broody (if she does, some never go broody) you will have a dozen eggs available and you can put the freshest underneath her.
     
  5. wtouvell

    wtouvell Just Hatched

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    I guess that's what I needed to know. I didn't know how long they stay broody when they do get there. Will they be broody long enough to lay about 8 eggs and stay the whole time needed?
     
  6. wtouvell

    wtouvell Just Hatched

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    That is a good idea. I might try that. But are the eggs still good to eat after sitting out for 12 or more days?
     
  7. wtouvell

    wtouvell Just Hatched

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    I have Rhode Island Reds. Do they go Broody often?
     
  8. FridayYet

    FridayYet Innocent Bystander

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    Yes, if you don't wash them and your storage place is fairly cool. The natural bloom protects them from spoiling.
    If you are thinking of setting 8, you could only keep 8 out at a time.

    I know nothing about RIR, not sure if they are known to go broody or not.
     
  9. AmyLynn2374

    AmyLynn2374 Humidity Queen

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    Oh, yeah, if the chicken is truely broody, she'll give you time. You can always buy the fake eggs to put in the nest if you are worried too.

    Like Friday said, if they aren't washed and sitting in warm temps, they last longer. I believe we are one of the only places that actually refridgerate our eggs.


    RIRs are a breed popular for egg production so the breed as a whole has been bred to NOT be broody. It doesn't mean that they can't be, just that the chances are less for them to be.
     
  10. TheHoranFarm

    TheHoranFarm Out Of The Brooder

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    RIR'S arent broody chickies, they had it bred out of them!
    good luck though!
     

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