New to Hatching Quail

Discussion in 'Quail' started by willow_lane, Oct 19, 2009.

  1. willow_lane

    willow_lane Out Of The Brooder

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    Oct 19, 2009
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    My daughters (ages 8 and 3) would like to start hatching quail. We are going to attempt to hatch a few quail in the basement. I purchased a Chick-Bator because of the low cost to get started.

    We will be attempting to hatch 8 Courtnix eggs. Does anyone have any advice they would like to share?

    We are hoping to purchase a larger / better incubator in the spring but just can't afford one now.

    This is a great site. Thanks for everything.
     
  2. shelleyd2008

    shelleyd2008 the bird is the word

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    No offense, but the first bit of advice I have to offer is to throw that chickbator away and get a real incubator. You will be disappointed in your results. From what I've heard, the chickbators are very hard to regulate temp and humidity in, and very rarely does anyone ever have anything hatch in them. Of course there are exceptions, and you might get lucky. I would take it back and get an LG or Hovabator, they aren't much more expensive than the chickbators, and they work much better.

    Good luck with it, if you do keep it [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Oct 19, 2009
  3. Emilys3guppies

    Emilys3guppies Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Or, if you like a project, you could make your own forced air incubator for about the cost of the chickbator. I made mine for under $30.

    I haven't used one myself, but I've never read a good review of the chickbator and wouldn't want to see your children disappointed if nothing hatches, especially cause fertility is lower at this time of year.
     
  4. willow_lane

    willow_lane Out Of The Brooder

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    Ok. Thanks for the heads up on the Chick Bator. I read a few good reviews on it so that is why I went that route. I got it for $18 so I am not out a lot. The tractor Supply Company in my area sells "The Little Giant" but the guy at the store told me that it was not meant to be used for small quanites of eggs. He said that it is built to do full (40) chicken egg hatches.

    So If I do need to purchase an different incubator, Would spending more on a Brinsea Mini-eco help? Money is a concern, but I also know that sometimes I will have to spend money to see success.

    Thanks again for any additional advice you can give me.
     
  5. Emilys3guppies

    Emilys3guppies Chillin' With My Peeps

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    You can still get good results with a larger incubator. The trick is to fill the space with *something*. Even if it's not full of eggs, you can put babyfood jars filled with water or sand to fill up the extra room. They will absorb the heat and keep the temperature stable.
     
  6. willow_lane

    willow_lane Out Of The Brooder

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    Oct 19, 2009
    Pennsylvania
    Sorry to ask so many questions, but I would like to make sure I do this correctly.

    So what would be a better choice the LG for $43 from TSC, the Therman Air Hova-Bator for $60, or the Hova-bator (w/fan) for $80? How important is an egg turner? TSC has an egg turner for $41 but I don't know if it would work for Quail Eggs.

    Thanks again
     
  7. Emilys3guppies

    Emilys3guppies Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I have a homemade bator, but I've heard the best things about the hovabators, as far as styrofoam bators. You mentioned the Brinsea earlier though...if it's on your list, that's the one I'd go for.

    I don't have a turner...if I had to choose between a fan and a turner, I'd choose the fan.

    There's another thread active on this board about different kinds of incubators. You might find it interesting.
     
    Last edited: Oct 19, 2009
  8. Thingrizzly

    Thingrizzly Out Of The Brooder

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    I started with the styrofoam incubators, and they are all pretty much the same.

    Best advice I can give is to set it up where you WILL NOT have major temp swings.
    Completely fill water trays each day.
    DO NOT open except to turn eggs.

    When I started, I was getting 80% hatch with with no fan or turner.
    If I ignored my own advice, hatch dropped to 25 or 30%.

    If you go with styrofoam, fill with water and let it run at least a day after you get the temp set, then put in your eggs.

    Good luck, and after your first hatch you'll be hooked

    Kenneth
     
  9. Kullas

    Kullas Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Quote:lg or hovabator is about the same (i have a hova bator) ya dont need a turner but you will have to turn them atleast 3 timea a day if ya cant then get a turner. most turners comes with chicken egg trays. ya can use them but will have to use a piece of cotton in the bottoms of the cups. some of the eggs will even set upright setting in the hole in the bottom of the cup. just make sure the pointy end is down. turn for 14 days and then bump up the humidity to 70% and leave alone untill day 18 or so they can hatch anywhere from day 15 to day 20 but most of the time around day 18. if you are using a turner take them out of the turner on day 14
     
  10. shelleyd2008

    shelleyd2008 the bird is the word

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    The hovabators and the LGs are about the same, if you get the same type. The picture window hovabators seem to hold their temps much better though. I have a 1588 and a 1583 hova, the difference is one is digital and one is wafer thermostat. I prefer the wafer model, but they both work good. They are also both forced-air, which makes a huge difference. The LGs are good bators, but it takes a bit of trial-and-error to learn how to use them. if you keep something in the bator, like rocks, brick, water-filled plastic bags, jars of water/sand with the lid, it will decrease the need to have more eggs. The trick is to have it full, it doesn't have to be full of eggs [​IMG] A turner is not necessary, you just have to be sure to turn them at least 2 times a day, but more is better. The turners turn continuously, either 4 or 6 times a day, I can't remember.

    The brinseas are very good bators, plus they are easy to clean. I've not used one myself (the ones in my price range are too small [​IMG]) but I've heard only the best about them. If you can afford to get one, that's what I'd go with. [​IMG]
     

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