New to meat birds.. need help and advice..

Discussion in 'Meat Birds ETC' started by sniper338, Sep 12, 2016.

  1. sniper338

    sniper338 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Dec 15, 2013
    San Antonio, Texas
    I have a good healthy flock consisting of barred rocks, black copper marans, lavender copper marans, lavender ameraucanas, gold laced polish, a few silkies, Delewares, and white leghorns.


    Im now wanting to get into meat birds.. I was going to get a good white cornish roo and breed him to white rocks and produce my own broilers... BUT after reaearch ive found that a white cornish is very hard to find, and it occurred to me the meat industry has excelled their line of birds to make what they sell in stores and you cant just breed a cornish and get that meat bird like you buy in the grocery store..


    Ive read and read and it is starting to seem like its just easier, cheaper in the long run, and more efficient to just buy broiler chicks and raise them out...

    Whats the consensus?

    And whats the tricks to raising out broilers for meat/guide to raising broilers...?
     
  2. tmarsh83

    tmarsh83 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Oct 16, 2015
    NEIN
    I don't think there is one set answer, it depends on your goals and what/how you want to do things.

    For me, currently, purchasing cornishX birds and raising and processing them makes the most sense for me. I'll be doing that next year. I, like you, have toyed with the idea of some sort of home brewed, sustainable, dual purpose flock, but the logistics aren't there for the scale to work out for the number of birds I want to do a year, the space I currently have to do it, and the coop space.

    So I plan to tractor/range a batch or two of cornishX chicks next year and see how it goes.

    As to the "tricks" I'm not sure exactly what you are asking but things like 12 on/12 off feed to moderate growth curve, and access to range time to try to keep the birds more active are popular tips you will find with a little research.
     

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