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NEW to raising chicks

Discussion in 'Raising Baby Chicks' started by Annjela, Jun 8, 2011.

  1. Annjela

    Annjela New Egg

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    Jun 8, 2011
    Hi everyone-

    I plan on getting some chicks here soon and I’m looking for tips/advice/suggestions. We plan on getting 4-8 chicks. We have a friend who is an excellent wood builder (yes, I know, they have a fancier name. Oh! Carpenter [​IMG] ) and he is going to build us a custom coop to fit our budget. When the chicks are old enough to be put into their coop they will also be able to free range in the early evenings. Any suggestions on the best type of coop, things the coop SHOULD have, or what is the best type of coop? I have never had chickens before, but I’ve done a lot of reading to help me out. These chicks will become more of our family then just birds. I want to raise these little chicks for my daughter. I think it’s a great experience (for our whole family!), she will love to be the one to collect the eggs, and she will really get to learn about these chickens.
    I know there is lots to learn and things I should really know before raising these chicks and I’m open to ANY information. Any information on their adult hood as well. [​IMG]

    AND- I'm new to BYC, so hello to all and this seems to be a GREAT site for help! [​IMG]
     
  2. jtbrown

    jtbrown Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Mar 30, 2011
    Southeastern Ohio
    Welcome,[​IMG] we're new here too. Look at the sticky notes at top of most forums. They are at the top and noted "sticky" very good basic info even if occasionally going into personal preference and some light bantering, good to hear several view points regardless. Ventilation is key and Pat has a big info sheet on that as a sticky. Also, beings new I feel like we are winging it (no pun really intended) but have learned food, water, shelter from weather and predators and these little chickens are pretty adaptable. Good luck from Ohio![​IMG]
     
  3. jeanniejayne

    jeanniejayne Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Nov 30, 2008
    mid-Delaware
    I would get Chickens for Dummies if you don't have it, and definitely look over all the coops in the pages here. [​IMG]

    It depends really on whether you want stationary or moveable. For the amount of chix you are getting you could have either. [​IMG]

    We used the back of a shed -- walled off the final 8 feet of a 12 x 16 shed, and put a door on the side and a window in the back, and a run on the side with the door (there is a pop door in the big door). But before I finally got hubby to agree to that plan, I had bought a tractor big enough for 4-5 large hens, on line. Now we use both -- tractor for up-and-coming, and shed for the big girls ( I have 12 grown-ups now, 2 two-week-olds, and another 15 eggs in the 'Bator).

    The more reading you do the better. Folks are really helpful here! [​IMG]

    Then, just jump in before you get intimidated![​IMG]
     
  4. AKsmama

    AKsmama Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jun 20, 2010
    South Carolina
    [​IMG] and welcome to the world of chickens! You will soon be addicted [​IMG]

    One suggestion- please put your location in your profile so it shows up on the sidebar. It doesn't have to be specific; even a general area like "Pacific Northwest" or "Coastal South" really helps when people are trying to answer posts, especially ones about coops. It gives an idea about whether you might need to insulate in winter, what predators you have (and even if you live in the middle of a city, you have them), all kinds of stuff.

    Make sure to post pictures of your babies when you get them!
     
  5. llaaadyel

    llaaadyel Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Sep 12, 2010
    Lower NY
    Welcome to the wonderful world of chickens. It is a great experience.

    I agree with the previous poster. Get a chickens for dummies book. You will find a lot of information you need. Also, read everything you can to educate yourself about them before getting them. Learn about the illnesses that they can get so that you are prepared to prevent them and also treat them if needed.

    Coop 4 sq foot per bird for standard birds a bit less for bantams. Make sure it is predator proof. There is a lot to think about there. I went from a very small number to a larger number and am just about finished building an 8x8 coop. There were tons of things that I had to consider when building. Your location will determine how you need to handle heat and or cold in the winter.

    Good luck
     
  6. Annjela

    Annjela New Egg

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    Jun 8, 2011
    Thanks guys! I WILL get the book- Chickens For Dummies! Someone mentioned I should post my location, how do I do that? Also, I've read a few times about stickies? What are those? I promise, I'll get the hang of this soon! [​IMG]
    Oh, one more thing! Anywhere on here does it tell you when someone has replied to my post?
     
  7. mszekely

    mszekely Out Of The Brooder

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    May 10, 2011
    Vermilion, OH
    Ditto on reading everything possible on this site, also the Chickens for Dummies book is great! I have several books and it was the best for info, including drawings of chicken and egg anatomy! No photos though. You can find plenty of those here.
     

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