new to the chicken world and look for some advice

Discussion in 'New Member Introductions' started by lilmarie84, Mar 28, 2017.

  1. lilmarie84

    lilmarie84 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I'm a life long city girl that married a country boy and I have been wanting to get chickens for sometime now. Been waiting on my husband to build my chicken coop before I do but that he still hasn't done it yet. I think I'm just going to have to get the chicks for him to build the coop cuz we had no intentions on getting a rabbit my ex gave the kids a rabbit for their b-day and the rabbit had a cage built that same day so that gave me the idea get the chicks so he has to build me my coop lol.

    Anyways here is where I need the advice.

    I can't decide between the buff orpingtons and the white rocks.

    Which one has the least aggressive rooster of the 2.

    And lastly how many should I get for a family of 8 that loves eggs?
    We go threw we go threw about 3 dz a week.

    Your thoughts please and thanks.
     
  2. zebraffe4231

    zebraffe4231 Out Of The Brooder

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    My buff rooster is very aggressive but ive met buff roos that arent. And I dont know about white rocks. But for a family of 8 and 3 doz a week id say 20-30 hens. I also would suggest having the coop built before you get the chicks because it does take a while and they grow very quickly.
     
  3. N F C

    N F C dem crazy bones Premium Member

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    [​IMG]

    If you're concerned about getting an aggressive rooster, maybe just get females. You don't need a male to get plenty of eggs (unless you want to have fertile eggs).

    Good luck!
     
  4. Hillaire

    Hillaire Chillin' With My Peeps

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    good morning and welcome to BYC. I had to do the same thing when it came to building a coop soon as I got the chicks it kicked my butt into high gear. As far as Buff Orpingtons and white rocks go I want to say that I have no experience with white rock roosters but any buff orpington rooster that I've come across have been pretty docile. As far as how many if you are going through 3 dozen a week I would say you could get away with getting 10-12 hens each will lay 3-5 eggs per week from everything I am seeing online. I bought buff orpington bantam chicks for my flock a few weeks back obviously won't be as productive as the regular BO but excited to see how they do. Either way you can't go wrong :)
     
  5. redsoxs

    redsoxs Chicken Obsessed

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    Greetings from Kansas, lilmarie84, and [​IMG]! Pleased you joined our community! I have both Buff Orps and White Rocks. I tend the think the Rocks handle the heat better and tend to be less broody - but both are excellent choices. You could also have a mixed flock! And I concur with the rooster advice already given - not necessary for eggs to occur. Best wishes and thanks for joining BYC! [​IMG]
     
  6. lilmarie84

    lilmarie84 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    My husband wants me to choose just one breed to start with which I'm sure everyone here knows that is not an easy thing to do. As for the rooster we do want some fertilized eggs which is something else I was wondering should I keep the hens meant for laying separated from the ones that we want to mate or does it not matter?
     
  7. redsoxs

    redsoxs Chicken Obsessed

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    It won't likely matter much in terms of the eggs you intend to eat. They will look and eat the same even if they are fertilized. Sometimes the hens get a little frazzled from being pursued by the rooster so if you wanted to keep them separate. Just be careful that the hens that you use for breeding don't get overbred by the rooster - you'll notice bare patches on the hen's back from the constant mounting and generally neurotic hens.
     
  8. Eggsakly

    Eggsakly Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I suspect you may eat even more eggs when you have your own hens. The fresh eggs are delicious.

    I have no experience with either Plymouth Rocks or Buff Oringtons, but I've been reading and reading for three years and I can easily summarize the generalities I have come across regarding both breeds, because I've been looking at them, too, in the bantam size. Barred Rocks are one of the top favorite breeds for backyard chickens for both laying and friendliness. People love their Barred Rocks. I don't know if they are friendlier than the other Plymouth Rocks, but the Rocks in general are said to be smart, curious, friendly, independent, neither bullies nor bullied by other breeds, and of course, the Barred Rocks can be sexed at hatching, which I suspect has helped their greater popularity. However, the roosters are usually more aggressive than the hens.

    The Buff Orpingtons are the #1 most popular breed for being sweet, friendly, and good layers. They and the Plymouth Rocks lay about the same number of eggs on average. People adore their Orpingtons. Many people say their BO roos are also quite nice compared to other roosters. The BO is a slightly larger bird than the Rocks. I would read the breed reviews on this site and see what others say about both breeds.

    For myself, I don't eat meat, so I don't need or want "dual purpose" chickens. Are you or hubby going to slaughter the cockerels you hatch out and don't want beyond about five months old, or do you plan on selling the babies locally? You have a big family? You may want to raise your own table birds.

    I'm not sure what the big deal is with one breed or two, apart from the fact that Orpingtons are often picked on by other breeds. If you want to try two different breeds together, the easiest time to get them both is at the start when they first hatch. Personally, that's a little too controlling for my taste, and as an old, long-time single woman who built her own coop and will do whatever I please with three-dollar chickens, I say get what you want and see for yourself which breed you like best, or if you like them both. You can sell any you don't want locally. And if hubby (who won't help to begin with) makes anything of it, put an ad out for him, too. You can see why I have been single almost all of my life. [​IMG] Personally, I recommend doing what you want . . .
     
    Last edited: Mar 28, 2017
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  9. Eggsakly

    Eggsakly Chillin' With My Peeps

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    This is my coop just after construction when there was a lot of clean-up to do. It is a variation of a coop design here on this site that I built inside a small cabin/shop on my property. The outside gets painted this year after the weather warms up. It took a couple of weeks to do, and it wasn't easy, I won't lie. But I'm in my mid-60s, and I did every single bit of it, including carrying the big sheets of press board. If I can do it, anyone can.


    [​IMG]





    I put my nest boxes inside the coop, rather than outside; I live in Alaska and it helps the eggs not to freeze so quickly in cold temps. Access to the nest boxes:
    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Mar 28, 2017
  10. N F C

    N F C dem crazy bones Premium Member

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    @Eggsakly that's a nice looking coop...good job!
     

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