New to the Goat Game. Anyone with Nigerian Dwarf/Pygmies advice?

Discussion in 'Other Pets & Livestock' started by lhutch78, Sep 23, 2012.

  1. lhutch78

    lhutch78 Out Of The Brooder

    54
    1
    48
    Sep 5, 2012
    South Georgia, USA
    Tackling chickens & goats as a 1st time owner. Everything going well so far. Looking for any advice from any experienced owners for any thing I should look out for.


    We are the proud owners of a set of twins Emma & Pedro born 07/06/12. They are a Nigerian/ Pygmy mix.
    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]

    Dixie a/k/a "Big Mama" will be leaving us next week & returning to her owner.


    and our blue eyed pretty boy Nigerian named Taz.

    [​IMG]
     
  2. Nathan Sampson

    Nathan Sampson Chillin' With My Peeps

    192
    4
    99
    Apr 12, 2012
    Whitewater Mo
    I am going to say this they are really cute. Your fence looks to be good right now but I wil tell you that they will lay into it and rub there sides down it and stretch it out and make it sage down. Mine turned into the shape of an S with the goats working the bottom on one side and the horses working the top of the other side.
     
    Last edited: Sep 23, 2012
  3. Stacykins

    Stacykins Overrun With Chickens

    4,356
    201
    258
    Jan 19, 2011
    Escanaba, MI
    Are Taz and Pedro wethered (castrated)? If not, that would be a good thing to do, asap. They can get a young doeling pregnant, way before she really should be. That would be my only piece of advise at the moment.
     
  4. MiniatureCochin

    MiniatureCochin Out Of The Brooder

    52
    0
    39
    May 30, 2011
    Things I would note/read up on:
    1) Worms. Make sure you check the eyelids (search ''famacha chart'') to see if they are pale, and need to be de-wormed. Also rotate dewormer types.
    2) Check hooves every month; trim as necessary. It is really easy to forget this.
    3) If your bucks are not wethered, make sure they are asap. If you do plan to breed the doeling, make sure she is away from any bucks, and do not breed her until she's at least 10months old. Although it is possible to have them be bred and kid younger (safely), I would wait as long as possible (to 16months) for breeding her.
    4) For the bucks, read up on urinary calculi, a painful, but preventable condition, that I unfortunately did not know much of, and lost a buck to.
    5) Provide loose minerals, and try to get them specifically for goats (most are for sheep).

    That's all I can think of now....

    Hope it helps,

    MC
     
  5. lhutch78

    lhutch78 Out Of The Brooder

    54
    1
    48
    Sep 5, 2012
    South Georgia, USA
    Thanks everyone!

    Nathan- Yes the fence is a surprise to us how they would rub against. This pen however is also enclosed on about 2.3 acres previously fenced for horses. We let them out to graze each day.

    Stacykins- We have an appt to have Taz & Pedro to be castrated already this week. :)

    Miniture-I have read a little about that. I will keep an eye out. We have an appt with a vet on Wed to have the boys castrated. I will make sure to ask him lots!
     
  6. Nathan Sampson

    Nathan Sampson Chillin' With My Peeps

    192
    4
    99
    Apr 12, 2012
    Whitewater Mo
    On the minerals I had a man who raised horses tell me about loose minerals and he would pour them in a tub and then fill it up with water. He said because it could get in the animal faster. Just a suggestion.
     
  7. LydiaB

    LydiaB Out Of The Brooder

    95
    2
    33
    May 28, 2012
    You don't want to mix water with your minerals. It will neutralize the copper, which is very important for goats. You want to keep them dry. Make sure you get a goat mineral, not one for sheep. Copper kills sheep but goats need a lot of it to be healthy.
     
  8. Stacykins

    Stacykins Overrun With Chickens

    4,356
    201
    258
    Jan 19, 2011
    Escanaba, MI
    Since a goat should eat loose minerals as needed, I don't think it is the best suggestion. A goat can self regulate their mineral intake. They know when to go lick up some of their loose minerals. I know some new goats I got recently, at first they devoured the mineral as soon as I put it out. Now, after a few weeks, they only lick up a bit as needed like the others. They didn't have loose minerals where they were, so they were making up for a deficiency (not one bad enough to see, yet, though).

    I believe if the water is high in iron, it can impede copper absorption. Not everywhere in the country does water have a high level of Fe. Most hard water is caused by an excess of calcium and magnesium cations. But yea, I agree with keeping the minerals dry.
     

BackYard Chickens is proudly sponsored by