New Zealand Kiwi - I want some!

Discussion in 'Random Ramblings' started by gryeyes, Jan 26, 2013.

  1. gryeyes

    gryeyes Covered in Pet Hair & Feathers

    I've been watching "Mutant Planet" and I want a Kiwi (bird).

    Flightless, 80 day incubation (by the males), hatch fully feathered! The poor hen carries her huge egg INSIDE for 10 days and the egg is nearly the size of her body; she's very uncomfortable until she lays it in a safe spot, then she walks away. Not broody at all - but her mate is!

    Apparently they are very long-lived: 30 years! And they lay once a year (at least that's what I surmised by the program mentioning they live 30 years and mated pairs can raise 30 chicks over their lifetimes).

    Of course I don't really want to add Kiwis to my flock, but aren't they interesting? Their nostrils are at the END of their long beaks. :lol:
     
  2. Chick N Haus

    Chick N Haus Chillin' With My Peeps

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    And you think you have problems with neighbors and roosters? Just wait until you get a Kiwi!!!
     
  3. shadow rabbit10

    shadow rabbit10 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Too bad they aren't allowed... I love Kiwis! I have been obsessed with them for like three years and they are one of my favorite birds! Have you ever seen pics of a white Kiwi? They are ADORABLE!
     
  4. gryeyes

    gryeyes Covered in Pet Hair & Feathers

    The Kakapo, a nine pound flightless parrot also seemed like a nifty pet. :lol:

    Especially because I've lived where feral parrots - in flocks - have grown from escaped parrots. You gotta know when a parrot escapes, the owner is heartbroken.


    :/ I bet even I can outrun a fat parrot.
     
  5. shadow rabbit10

    shadow rabbit10 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Gotta love Kakapos! New Zealand is known as the "Land of the Birds" due to the wide variety of species that live there. It is a beautiful country too. In fact, if I had to move to any country, it would be New Zealand.
     
  6. pipdzipdnreadytogo

    pipdzipdnreadytogo Dorking Queen Premium Member

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    I love Kakapo parrots. :love They look so fuzzy.

    New Zealand is full of interesting critters. How about the Moa? Imagine having a 500-pound, 12-foot-tall tinamou guarding your flock! Too bad Moa are extinct. :/
     
    Last edited: Jan 26, 2013
  7. shadow rabbit10

    shadow rabbit10 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    They are incredible! They truly look like the link between reptiles and birds.
     
  8. Mykee

    Mykee Chillin' With My Peeps

    Shadow Rabbit, I would move to New Zealand too! It's such a wild, unique, and beautiful country, plus my favorite movies were filmed there!
    I love Kiwis. Unfortunately they are endangered, like most cool birds, and when I went to the National Zoo, they only showed Kiwis at certain times due to stress levels.


    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]
     
  9. shadow rabbit10

    shadow rabbit10 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    And, it is a very free country, compared to many others out there. I did a whole research report on it last year. It's a great place. If I did move there, I could have so much fun being an ornithologist!
     
  10. pipdzipdnreadytogo

    pipdzipdnreadytogo Dorking Queen Premium Member

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    :thumbsup That'd be the best place to study ornithology... :love



    From Wikipedia:

    [​IMG]

    Comparison of a kiwi (Apteryx sp., Apterygidae, Struthioniformes), ostrich (Struthio camelus, Struthionidae, Struthioniformes), and giant moa (Dinornis giganteus, Dinornithidae, Dinornithiformes), each with its egg.




    :eek: This really puts into perspective how large the Kiwi's egg is!




    Also from Wikipedia:

    [​IMG]

    Richard Owen, who became director of London’s Museum of Natural History, was the first to recognise that a bone fragment he was shown in 1839 came from a large bird. When later sent collections of bird bones, he managed to reconstruct moa skeletons. In this photograph, published in 1879, he stands next to the largest of all moa, Dinornis maximus (now D. novaezealandiae), while holding the first bone fragment he had examined 40 years earlier.




    Okay, forget riding an Ostrich. :lol: It's like a two-legged horse!
     

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