newb questions

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by dartfreak75, Oct 5, 2013.

  1. dartfreak75

    dartfreak75 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I have a couple questions I'm just gonna put under one thread. First off my hens just started laying last sat and in five days I got 12 eggs iv got five hens at laying age. I haven't gotten any since Thursday until this morning and I got one but it didn't have a shell best I can describe it is like a water balloon. Is this normal? What should I do ? Second iv got a hen with a weird looking rash on its comb it looks like blisters or something im including pics of both what is it should i be worried ? Also iv got two hens and my roo with really floppy combs is this normal ? Thanks for any help.
     
  2. dartfreak75

    dartfreak75 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    [​IMG][​IMG][​IMG]
     
  3. Angelicisi

    Angelicisi Overrun With Chickens

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    Add some oyster shell or crush up egg shells and offer them in a bowl. It's normal for new layers to work out a few kinks before getting the hang of it. Soft shelled eggs are common and an easy fix :) add some calcium.
     
  4. Wyandottes7

    Wyandottes7 Overrun With Chickens

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    Sometimes chickens lay soft shelled eggs. It happens especially when they are new to laying, or if they are old hens that have been laying for years. However, birds of all ages can occaisonally lay soft shelled eggs. Make sure that you are giving them enough calcium. Layer feed usually contains enough calcium on its own, but it is often a good idea to supplement them with crushed oystershell or ground up egg shell.

    The picture of the hen's comb is a little blurry, so I can't tell for sure what it is. Could you get another photo? The scabs/blisters could be wounds caused by pecking. They could also be the beginnings of Fowl Pox, which is a viral disease of chickens. Fowl Pox causes scabs and blisters, and can sometimes turn to wet Fowl Pox, and cause lesions in the throat. Fowl pox usually runs its course in several weeks, and isn't usually deadly. It is transmitted by mosquitoes and other flying insects, so if you treat your area for them, you can prevent your other birds from getting the disease.

    Some breeds of chickens just have floppy combs. For example, the Leghorn almost always has a floppy comb. Its probably nothing to worry about.
     
  5. dartfreak75

    dartfreak75 Chillin' With My Peeps

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  6. dartfreak75

    dartfreak75 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    It very well could be the fowl pox because we are covered in mosquitos this year this has been the wettest summer iv ever known and the mosquitos are thriving. I add two more pics. I breathed a sigh of Relief Earlier i got three perfect eggs this evening so i was worrying for nothing thanks for the replies.
     
  7. dartfreak75

    dartfreak75 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I researched fowl pox and it looks a lot like what's on my hens comb what should I do should I separate her from the flock or is it to late for that ? just my luck I finally started getting eggs now something else to kill my flock :(
     
  8. Eggcessive

    Eggcessive True BYC Addict Premium Member

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    Fowl pox is a virus carried by mosquitoes and then spread from chicken to chicken. You can separate the ones with it if you wish, but they may be exposed already. There is no treatment. The wet form of fowl pox is very serious and can be deadly. Look inside the beaks of the affected chickens for any yellow or white material that shouldn't be there. They can get it in their airway and suffocate. Here is some info: https://www.backyardchickens.com/a/avian-pox-how-to-treat-your-chickens-for-avian-pox
    http://posc.tamu.edu/files/2012/08/Fowl-pox.pdf
     
  9. dartfreak75

    dartfreak75 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Ok thanks i read the link. If it is fowl pox are the eggs safe to eat?
     
  10. Eggcessive

    Eggcessive True BYC Addict Premium Member

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    The eggs are fine to eat unless you start antibiotics.
     

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