Newbie Planning on Releasing 3 Doz Juvies

Discussion in 'Quail' started by Sosalty, Feb 18, 2017.

  1. Sosalty

    Sosalty Just Hatched

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    Feb 18, 2017
    I've ordered 3 dozen bobwhites from a quail ranch an hour's drive off. We've just retired and moved to the country (northern Alabamie) 2 years back. There was 2 bobwhites to be heard year 1 and then just a lonely bobwhite year 2. Haven't heard a quail these last 4-5 months. Started cage trapping and to my astonishment, been getting coon and possum in high numbers, 17 since Jan 1 on our 5 acres. Glad I did so, seems a heavy population would stress all ground nesters.

    OK folks, I know next to nothing about poultry, they taste good and are mostly pleasant in the wild. Guy I'm getting the young quail from says release is OK, but don't expect many to survive. I'm hesitant as to building a coop but would like to enhance the little fellas survival chances. What, in practical terms, should I do?
     
  2. BobDBirdDog

    BobDBirdDog Chillin' With My Peeps

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    You should have some reserve about releasing them and expecting them to survive the wild. Quail forever, notes that only about 20% of wild quail "bw" last longer than 1.5 years. Pen raised birds are often noted as to a mere 2% survival rate.

    I would build a pen and save them for your personal enjoyment, or hunting season.
    Since the 1970s, the Bobwhite populations have decreased drastically. I'm not up to date but I think compared to the 70s, today we have close to a 80% decrease in our nations wild populations.

    I have hunted them since the 70s, and have to agree. Thus I raise my own.

    I hate to say it but, if you have the money to blow and feed the wild animals, you might get a year or two pleasure out of the release.

    Also, many states wildlife laws contradict what your seller has told you about releasing, so better check in on that from your states wildlife agency (internet) source before releasing them....or not brag about it until you know for sure. You can call them as well and ask as they cant fine you for asking about the rules. [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Feb 18, 2017
  3. Sosalty

    Sosalty Just Hatched

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    Lots of hunters releasing the bobwhite then walking the fields to shoot 'em. Can't see a problem with the legal aspect. The outdoor magazines for AL have regular articles to improve the habitat and expressing hopes to increase their numbers. I believe AL and 3 of our closest states do the same. Unsure about Mississippi.

    Yep, the bobwhite population in the SouthEast is disappearing, hard to tell which factors contribute to their demise the most. As a teenager, the woods would be full of bobwhite calls, literly 100s within ear range. I've visualled a lone turkey and found her tracks year 1 also, but not year 2. I've put a dent in the racoon and possum numbers on my place, legally, and will keep it up. We'll see if it helps.

    Anyway, come March 1, I'll pour some feed on the ground, release, and wish 'em well.
     
    Last edited: Feb 18, 2017
  4. BobDBirdDog

    BobDBirdDog Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I dont know the regulations in AL, but across the fence here in TN they have laws against the who and where (you can release and reglation BS) if you know what I mean. Heck, I cant even hatch a dang Bobwhite egg without a propagators license.....but I can buy live birds an raise them all I want.... Its down right stupid and its a d**n goverment money making scheme. what else is new.

    Personally, I say "A mans gotta do what a mans gotta do" and wish you luck and happy hunting

    but just so you know I posted the other.

    For some reason, pen raised bobwhites will rarely nest in the cages and less in the wild so I have witnessed and hear. It seems to be bred out of them somehow. But I would just about bet if they can live long enough to nest, they will pick it back up...But who knows, but Biologist seem to know all about it and will tell you it is a futile effort.
    Heres a article from your neck of the woods http://www.aces.edu/pubs/docs/A/ANR-0516/index2.tmp that says more than I can if you care to read it.

    Whatever you decide, good luck with it and hope it works.
     
  5. Dragons4u

    Dragons4u Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Here in Ohio, we now have a couple different types of permits you can get for bobwhites. One allows you to raise them, another let's you raise and sell them, and yet another to raise and release them. Without a permit, you aren't even supposed to possess them at all.
     
  6. BobDBirdDog

    BobDBirdDog Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Seems just about every state has that Motto "If you have the dime we have the time and a license that guarantees your freedom"..... for a year until the permit expires!

    Tn has the propagator license and a commercial.Maybe a few others now I am sure.

    You can own Bobs with no permit, but cant hatch unless you have the propagator license. Then you can hatch and sell, but not release...not even on your own property. If you want to release you have to notify them and they come in and test (probably at my expense) and if I get their blessing, they will allow release on a WMA but not my own land.
    However!!!!! If I apply and register my land as a PRIVATE OWNED WMA (FOR ANOTHER FEE) I can release the birds on my land.....once approved and tested (for another fee).

    The whole system is messed up! They should be paying me as I am the one doing all the work, improvement and managements!
     
    Last edited: Feb 22, 2017

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