Newbie question...hens and roosters

Discussion in 'Chicken Behaviors and Egglaying' started by Krispyrice1230, Jun 13, 2011.

  1. Krispyrice1230

    Krispyrice1230 New Egg

    8
    0
    7
    Jun 13, 2011
    So I am doing my research to see if raising chickens is something I want to get into. I have been reading on here for days, but still have a few questions.

    1. If I have a rooster, will my eggs always be fertilized, or is there only a specific time of the year for that? [​IMG]

    2. How do I plan coop space if I want my hens to raise chicks since I have no idea how many chicks there will be?

    And just so you know, I am looking for both eggs and meat, but I am not interested in raising meaties.

    Thanks for the help.
     
  2. CrazyChickensEverwhere

    CrazyChickensEverwhere Chillin' With My Peeps

    684
    0
    129
    Apr 8, 2011
    First off!!! [​IMG]



    Quote:
     
    Last edited: Jun 13, 2011
  3. Krispyrice1230

    Krispyrice1230 New Egg

    8
    0
    7
    Jun 13, 2011
    OK, so should I plan to separate the rooster from the hens until I want chicks?
     
  4. CrazyChickensEverwhere

    CrazyChickensEverwhere Chillin' With My Peeps

    684
    0
    129
    Apr 8, 2011
    No. The rooster can be in there at all times. You can't decide then you want chicks, the hens decided for you. You can't make a hen go broody (Broody means they decided they want to raise chicks) Once they go broody they are in the nest boxes almost 24/7 sometimes you have to force her out, she will puff up and usually scream and nip and your hands if you put them near her. Broodys will decided to brood at the most randomness times. If you don't want her to brood you can break her ( by break her I mean, break her from wanting chicks) To stop her you put her in a cage with no bedding and I wired bottom, that takes 2-3 days. You not suppose to feed them in the 2-3 days but I do because it seems mean to starve her.
     
  5. BrattishTaz

    BrattishTaz Roo Magnet

    4,445
    13
    213
    Jan 8, 2011
    Tampa Area, Florida
    Quote:There really is no reason to separate the roo from the hens. All you have to do is remove the eggs from the coop regularly. Fertile eggs can be eaten and you can only tell the difference if you know what to look for. When you are ready for chicks, just don't collect the eggs while your hen is broody. [​IMG]
     
  6. CrazyChickensEverwhere

    CrazyChickensEverwhere Chillin' With My Peeps

    684
    0
    129
    Apr 8, 2011
    krispy watch this video its a good information vid [​IMG]

     
  7. Ariel301

    Ariel301 Chillin' With My Peeps

    Nov 14, 2009
    Kingman Arizona
    Also, note that many of today's chickens, especially high-volume egg layers will not go broody. The instinct to do so has been carefully bred out of them, because a hen that is sitting on eggs and then raising chicks will not be laying eggs for several months, and egg producers don't want that. So if you want a chance at a hen that will go broody, you will need some that are known for still doing so, like a Silky or a Cochin. (which are neither excellent egg layers or meat birds) If you want chicks at predictable times, you will need an incubator, as hens only go broody on their own timing, not yours. Also, if the chicks are left with the hen in the flock, the rest of the birds may eat the chicks.
     

BackYard Chickens is proudly sponsored by