Newbie Question. What's the big deal about NPIP?

Discussion in 'Managing Your Flock' started by tsmith1499, Oct 3, 2011.

  1. tsmith1499

    tsmith1499 Out Of The Brooder

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    I am just curious what the big deal is about this and what you have to do to get an NPIP registration number. I do not plan on breeding or showing anytime soon. Just curious. Thanks, Tom
     
  2. Stacykins

    Stacykins Overrun With Chickens

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    Well, it certifies you as disease free (at least for a few BIG poultry diseases). Also, you can ship birds to most states with the USPS. You cannot ship with an NPIP certification. Some people will only buy birds or hatching eggs from NPIP flocks, since it reduces the chance of disease transfer (though quarantine is still important!).

    In some states, the testing and whatnot is nearly free, in others, quite expensive.
     
  3. speckledhen

    speckledhen Intentional Solitude Premium Member

    NPIP is really not for backyard flocks. It was created to protect the food supply from Pullorum/Typhoid. It does not certify your flock disease free except from two major diseases that are mostly eradicated anyway and sometimes Avian Influenza, depending on the state. Breeders must have it to send hatching eggs and live birds into other states, generally, in addition to extra permits for some individual states.

    NPIP does not mean the flock is free from the most common communicable diseases of poultry like Chronic Respiratory Disease, though if you pay extra for the quarterly testing, you can have them tested for that. You can actually have a flock with carrier diseases and still be NPIP certified.
     
  4. homesteadapps

    homesteadapps Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Preventing Pullorum Typhoid is not really about the food that you and I eat. It is a bacterial disease that creates high mortality in chickens, turkeys, and game bird flocks Nearly all chicks that get it die, and the ones that live become carriers.

    Hatching eggs which contain these bacteria and the chicks that are hatched with the infection frequently die.

    It's practically been eliminated in the US, but the state regulations still require certification on interstate sales.

    Most fairs and other shows also require the test, some annually, and some within 90 days, but not NPIP certification for show.
     
    Last edited: Oct 4, 2011
  5. Ridgerunner

    Ridgerunner True BYC Addict

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    What they said.

    Pullorum/Typhoid used to be a lot more common than it is now. The NPIP program has got it down to a point that it is seldom a worry for us or the commercial operations any more. It is not totally eradicated, but as long as the NPIP program stays in place, it should not become a major worry for us. The danger is when people become complacent and start shipping eggs or chicks without the testing. Then it can spread again. I think most shows will continue to require it.

    It is mainly for people selling chicks or hatching eggs or maybe showing chickens. You can contact your county extension agent, in the phone book under county government, to see what would be involved in getting your flock certified and maybe even learning how to do it yourself. It is different in each different state. But for most of us, it is not required.
     
  6. speckledhen

    speckledhen Intentional Solitude Premium Member

    Preventing Pullorum Typhoid is not really about the food that you and I eat

    It was the original purpose, to protect our food supply by eradicating those diseases. Many have the erroneous idea that it is for backyard flocks to be certified free of disease and therein, may provide a false sense of security for buyer and seller of birds/eggs. I just don't want anyone to have the wrong idea about NPIP. If you do sell hatching eggs or ship birds across state lines, it is required (or sometimes, I believe, a vet's certificate of health in lieu, but not 100% sure of that). It is what it is, but just don't make it more than it is. [​IMG] It's a government program and that alone bothers many backyard flock owners. If you don't regularly sell across state lines or show, it isn't something that you truly need. Of course, it's up to the individual what they want to do.​
     
  7. tsmith1499

    tsmith1499 Out Of The Brooder

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    I have read on the USDA website about what it's original intent was/is. I was just curious because I see so many people have it in their signatures. I am VERY familiar with what our state requires for health as my wife and I are superintendants of a barn at our County and Community fair. We have to know more than most because we are conidered a "petting zoo" even though we are really not. But people have access to touching the animals. We do a thing called Old MacDonald's Barn at our county fair and it is really for animal education. Kinda what this website is all about!! Thanks for the info. I will take all I can get! Tom
     
  8. WoodlandWoman

    WoodlandWoman Overrun With Chickens

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    It's a really good idea to find out what the regulations are for your state. Some states let you go to a swap without NPIP, but in a lot of states you need it, like mine. Most, if not all, require NPIP for chickens being brought into the state. Find out what the regulations are for your state and then you can see how that might effect any activities you might want to engage in.

    If you just want to have some chickens in your backyard for your own personal use, it's not a big deal. Once you start thinking about showing or shipping to other states, then it becomes very important.
     
  9. homesteadapps

    homesteadapps Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Quote:It was the original purpose, to protect our food supply by eradicating those diseases.

    If by protect the food supply, you mean, not having high death rates of chicks and diseased chickens then yes it is protecting the supply. I took a different meaning from the original post on my first read.

    Directly from the USDA:
    "The National Poultry Improvement Plan was established in the early 1930's to provide a cooperative industry, state, and federal program through which new diagnostic technology can be effectively applied to the improvement of poultry and poultry products throughout the country. The development of the NPIP was initiated to eliminate Pullorum Disease caused by Salmonella pullorum which was rampant in poultry and could cause upwards of 80% mortality in baby poultry. The program was later extended and refined to include testing and monitoring for Salmonella typhoid, Salmonella enteritidis, Mycoplasma gallisepticum, Mycoplasma synoviae, Mycoplasma meleagridis, and Avian Influenza. In addition, the NPIP currently includes commercial poultry, turkeys, waterfowl, exhibition poultry, backyard poultry, and game birds. The technical and management provisions of the NPIP have been developed jointly by Industry members and State and Federal officials. These criteria have established standards for the evaluation of poultry with respect to freedom from NPIP diseases."

    The best thing to do is to start here:

    http://www.aphis.usda.gov/animal_health/animal_dis_spec/poultry/

    then find out about your state regs.
     

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