Newbie question?

Discussion in 'Incubating & Hatching Eggs' started by ellenaspen, Feb 17, 2011.

  1. ellenaspen

    ellenaspen Out Of The Brooder

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    Feb 2, 2011
    Yet another question...I am putting my first eggs in my incubator this morning. I did a test run yesterday and it got to the temp and humidity I wanted and stayed there all night. Now I am ready to set my eggs. Do I let the system off and let it cool down, put my eggs in and let them slowly come up to temp...or is it OK to put them in right now with the temp and humity already set?

    TIA
     
  2. terrilhb

    terrilhb Chillin' With My Peeps

    Dec 11, 2010
    Georgia
    [​IMG] from Ga. I think you just put them in. Good luck [​IMG]
     
  3. MuscovyMad

    MuscovyMad Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Dec 2, 2010
    I let mine rise to room temperature and then put them in. They rise relatively slowly anyway. Good luck.
     
  4. ellenaspen

    ellenaspen Out Of The Brooder

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    Feb 2, 2011
    OK...they are going in now...wish me luck!!
     
  5. blefky

    blefky life in the yard

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    Mar 18, 2010
    stamford, ct
    Temp and humidity drop quickly when you open the incubator, so by the time you open it, and get your eggs settled in the way you want them you'll have lost much of the heat and humidity. Don't worry about it. Put your eggs in and don't adjust the temp or humidity right away. It takes time for the eggs to warm up. This may be of help:

    "Once eggs are in the incubator, do not adjust the temperature or humidity for a few hours unless the temperature exceeds 102 degrees F. After 4 hours, make proper adjustments. The final temperature should vary only degree above or below 99.5 degrees F. The temperature of incubators without circulating fans fluctuates more than incubators with circulating fans. If the temperature does not exceed 102 degrees F, the hatch should not be harmed.

    The small end of the egg should be lower than the large end of the egg when set in the incubator. An embryo orients during incubation so that the head develops toward the large end of the egg where the air cell is located. A chick's head can orient away from the air cell of the egg if the small end is higher than the large end during incubation. An embryo oriented in the wrong direction will not hatch." (taken from ogpbb.com)

    Good luck and [​IMG]
     
  6. ellenaspen

    ellenaspen Out Of The Brooder

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    Feb 2, 2011
    Great info...blefky
     

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