Newbie ?s: nutridrench, med. chick starter, grit

Discussion in 'Raising Baby Chicks' started by dominiquetrix, Jun 4, 2011.

  1. dominiquetrix

    dominiquetrix Out Of The Brooder

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    Hi,
    I have nine 10 day old chicks. They are of different breeds some being bantom. They have been on nutridrench in their water since day 2 and non-medicated feed (crumbles). Meant to get medicated just noticed it is not. I have 4 hens total and the chicks are seperated right now with the mother hen. I have to walk through the run where the adults are to get to the chicks so they are exposed to any issues the adults may have. (All, hens and chicks, seem healthy and are eating/drinking acting normally).

    My questions are : Should I switch to medicated feed and how long do the chicks need to be on nutridrench?

    Also the chicks are bedded on hay with the mother. Do I need to add grit? I don't know if they consume the hay but I suppose its possible. I've read about playsand, construction sand and parakeet grit. Any body have any info or thoughts on that?

    Thanks for your time!
     
  2. ChickyChickyBaby

    ChickyChickyBaby Barefoot Bantams

    OK..... here is what I do.

    I do not use hay. It harbors mold for one reason. Sand in the run would be OK. Not in the coop I don't think. I use pine shavings in mine.

    I do not use medicated feed. This is my choice. I have no clue about switching feed with them almost 2 weeks old. My feed comes from a local grain mill.

    I do not use nutridrench. I do have some on hand for our goats, but only give it to kids that are not thriving or seem to be lethargic.

    I do use SavAChick from Tractor Supply in the water for the first week.


    If a chick is hatched by me, I do not give grit until 4 weeks old, or whenever they go outside.

    If a chick is hatched by a hen, I keep the grit for her in the pen so if they want, the chicks can get some grit too. Hen usually calls them over for some.


    Hope someone else comes along with more ideas and thoughts.
     
  3. dominiquetrix

    dominiquetrix Out Of The Brooder

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    Mar 23, 2011
    Thanks Chicky!

    One more question. I have read a few articles that warn against aromatic bedding like pine and cedar. The reason being animals kept on it seem to have elevated liver enzymes which indicates toxicity at least at some level even if they don't show major symptoms.

    I chose hay because I didn't know what else to try. I only have a few birds so its easy to "pooper-scoop". I'm open to suggestions, though.

    Any thoughts?
     
  4. Anianna

    Anianna Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Pine shavings or pine pellets are just fine for chickens, though some other animals like rabbits can be sensitive to it. Cedar shavings aren't good for any animal that I know of, certainly none I have ever had. Cedar will cause respiratory distress in chickens and most small animals.

    Medicated feed that contains Amprolium helps chicks through their initial exposure to coccidiosis. It is the same medication used in larger doses to manage coccidiosis infections. Chicks should be on medicated feed (if you choose to use it) for about 2 weeks after exposure to the outdoors. If your chicks are in the run with their momma (or whatever chicken they think is their momma), then you are almost to the end of that exposure period already.

    Without signs or symptoms, I don't see any reason for hen-raised chicks to be on something like nutridrench. Starter/grower feeds are nutritionally balanced for chicks and hen-raised chicks tend to be more robust and healthier than brooder raised chicks.

    I agree totally with getting them off of straw. Straw molds and does not absorb well. Any runny poops and pees are just settling to your floor, which can cause damage and is just asking for disease. Pine shavings or pine pellets are ideal for the coop. I like the large shavings designed for horses. They are less dusty and brands like Statesman (sold at Southern States) sift the dust and small junk out.
     
  5. dominiquetrix

    dominiquetrix Out Of The Brooder

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    Mar 23, 2011
    Thanks Anianna.

    Since I've not used shavings before, are there any tips on clean up?
    How often do I change it out completely?
    Should I still remove solid poops daily or will the shavings dry them out leaving them less offensive?

    I use hay in the run as well. Should I switch that to shavings or sand or somwthing else?

    Thanks for all the input. I want my girls to be healthy and happy!
     
  6. Anianna

    Anianna Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I wouldn't use straw at all because of the mold issue and it sometimes attracts mice. We try to keep as little of it as possible around for our rabbits because of the mold and pests, but it is good for the rabbits' bored munching.

    I don't bother poop scooping, the pine shavings do decently. You can shovel, sweep, or shop vac it up every week or two. Some people prefer the "deep litter" method in which you just pile new shavings on old when they get stinky. It makes for good compost. Search BYC for "deep litter" and you should find some good discussions on the topic.

    Is there any grass in you run? Sand is good for the run and the chickens will love dust bathing and scratching in it.
     
  7. cmom

    cmom Hilltop Farm

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    My Coop
    I agree with the other posts. I use medicated Starter/Grower. I feed it to the birds until I get my first egg then I switch over to Layer. If I have any Starter/Grower or Grower left over when I get my first egg, I mix in the leftover feed with the Layer feed. I have never had any problems. The amprollium in the Starter or Starter/Grower helps in the chicks development in their resistance to cocci. It is sulfa based. There is only a problem eating the eggs layed by the birds that have had the medicated feed when they start to lay if you have any allergies to Sulfa. I do use layer pellets as I find the birds waste less.

    I put the vitamin with electrolytes in their water for the first couple of weeks then switch them to plain water.
     
  8. dominiquetrix

    dominiquetrix Out Of The Brooder

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    Mar 23, 2011
    Thanks for all the input everyone.

    Does anyone have any suggestions about what kind of sand?

    Does it matter? I have no grass in the run but as you all know it's covered in hay. This keeps down the mud, etc. so its pretty "clean".

    Are you all suggesting that the chicks will eat the sand in place of grit? Is it ok for them to have no grit now? They only have access to crumbles and the hay.
     

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