Newbie with breed questions

Discussion in 'General breed discussions & FAQ' started by mr.hutch23, Oct 30, 2010.

  1. mr.hutch23

    mr.hutch23 Out Of The Brooder

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    Oct 30, 2010
    I've been researching breeds for my first go into backyard chickens. I've narrowed my choice down to a few and would appreciate some feedback on my concerns/questions.

    1. Dominiques- Are they cold hardy enough for Northern Vermont?
    2. Australorps or Orpingtons- Will their combs get frostbit? Do they forage? They are big and I'm looking for layers more than meat birds, do they eat a lot of feed?
    3. Wyandotte- Seems like a good choice for us but this warning about some individuals being aggressive is cause for concern as we have a two year-old who is often out in the yard.

    I would just like to select one breed and stick with it as I'm led to believe that mixing/matching many different breeds of birds can lead to socialization/pecking order issues that I would rather avoid.

    Thanks for your time and have a great day!
     
  2. Chickanmanfromarkansas

    Chickanmanfromarkansas Chillin' With My Peeps

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    IMO Dominiques or Wyandottes would be your best choices. They do have a rosecomb that is less likely to get frostbitten, but they still can get frostbitten, just need to have them some good shelter for the winter time.
    As far as the aggressiveness goes in the Wyandottes, some are and some aren't. IMO a rooster that is not a little agressive is not doing his job in protecting the hens. I'm not saying like jumping on you every time you enter the pen, but careful and watchful.
    I have a White Rock rooster that tries to stay between me and the hens when I go into the pen, just protecting his ladies.
     
  3. tammyd57

    tammyd57 Chillin' With My Peeps

    Quote:Exactly.
    Orpingtons do eat a lot, although they are very mellow, lay well even through winter and if you get different colors it will be a colorful flock.
    To prevent frostbite on combs, their coop needs to have plenty of ventilation in the winter to prevent condensation. Moisture + cold = frostbite. You can also use vasaline on the combs to help protect them.
     
  4. mr.hutch23

    mr.hutch23 Out Of The Brooder

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    Oct 30, 2010
    Thanks for the comments, please keep them coming!
     
  5. mr.hutch23

    mr.hutch23 Out Of The Brooder

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    Oct 30, 2010
    bump
     
  6. Luckytaz

    Luckytaz Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Mar 28, 2010
    Rogers, Mn.
    Dominiques would be a good choice for you. They don't get quit as big as the others you mentioned, so eat less, also they're good for the north.
    If you can, try to buy from a breeder.
     
  7. punky rooster

    punky rooster Awesome

    Jul 21, 2010
    where would you get them from?
     
  8. Pequena Bandada

    Pequena Bandada Small Flock

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    Jun 13, 2010
    I've never heard that mixing breeds can lead to pecking or socialization problems... where did you get that info? I ask because MANY MANY MANY of us on this site have mixed breed flocks that do just fine. Currently I have 12 chickens - Australorp, EE, Silver Wyandotte, Silkie, Old English Game, Barred Rock, Red Star and White Leghorn.

    As for breed advice, just a thought that Australorps and Orpingtons are large birds. Really large. We got our chickens when my twin daughters had just turned three, and the Australorps -- while not aggressive -- were just too big to be around a three year old. My girls did much better around the EEs, who are smaller bodied (and a bit friendlier).
     
  9. mr.hutch23

    mr.hutch23 Out Of The Brooder

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    Oct 30, 2010
    Quote:I would hope to find someone locally that has chicks of the breed I decide to raise. If I'm unable to do that would probably order for McMurrays, I guess.
     
  10. mr.hutch23

    mr.hutch23 Out Of The Brooder

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    Oct 30, 2010
    Quote:I don't know where I heard about mixing different breeds, perhaps I'm confused, but it was my impression it would be easier to establish a pecking order and have fewer problems with similar sized, colored, aged birds. I'll certainly do some research and perhaps reconsider.
     

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