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Discussion in 'Raising Baby Chicks' started by sphillips, Feb 18, 2013.

  1. sphillips

    sphillips Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Feb 18, 2013
    New Mexico
    I just wanted to introduce myself, this is my first post here on this forum. My husband and I just moved to the country last summer, and I'd like to raise chickens. I have had chickens in the past, but it was so long ago that my memory fails me on quite a bit of information on this. We've almost finished our chicken coop, and I think I'm ready to buy some chicks to start. I have the plan of putting them in an old bath-tub out in the garage with a heat lamp etc. In the past I raised my chicks in a water trough, but since the bathtub is available, I thought I'd use that. Is the garage an okay place to raise these chicks? How long will I have to keep them under the lamp/in a smaller area until they are ready to put in the coop? I like the Rhode Island Reds and the Leghorns because they are hardy breeds (so I've read), and would like to know if these are good breeds to start with. Also, I'm assuming I won't have any eggs until next year. Is that correct? Thanks in advance for your patience![​IMG]
     
  2. ChckenBoy13

    ChckenBoy13 Out Of The Brooder

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    Feb 16, 2013
    Claremont, NC
    First off, [​IMG]! I hope you are enjoying it here so far and I know that you will find joy in your future chickens! The garage is a good place to keep chicks as long as it is sheltered and doesn't allow drafts. You will need to keep your chicks under a lamp that keeps it a steady 100*F for the first week and reduce the temperature 5 degrees each week afterwards until you reach 70*F. Once they're about a month old, they can be moved outside but I would recommend you keeping the lamp on them for another month or so. Lehorns and RIR are personally my favorites! I have a grandfather who raises RIR's and they are excellent chickens. I, myself, raise White Leghorns and some other varied breeds and I think that the Leghorns are the best, most reliable layers. As far as eggs are concerned, you should be expecting them in about 6 months or so! I hope you enjoy your chickens and your time here as well!
     
  3. jrudolph305

    jrudolph305 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Meadows of Dan, Va
    Welcome! Garage would be fine if it is predator proof. Lots of good info and if you go to the top of the page you can put in key words and lots of threads will come up. I am getting chicks for the first time this year and it seems as son as they feather out you can put them in the coop--seems like that is in the 4-6 week range. As far as breeds go these are good layers. Again go to the top of the page and click on breeds or google Hendersons chicken breeds and it gives good info. Most breeds will start laying eggs in the 18--24 month time frame. Have fun!!
     
  4. jrudolph305

    jrudolph305 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Dec 1, 2009
    Meadows of Dan, Va
  5. sphillips

    sphillips Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Feb 18, 2013
    New Mexico
    How do you reduce the heat? I'm assuming you move the lamp up? How much? Should I use a thermometer? Maybe I'm overthinking this?...........................
     
  6. ChckenBoy13

    ChckenBoy13 Out Of The Brooder

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    Feb 16, 2013
    Claremont, NC
    To reduce the heat, just either move the lamp higher or farther from the chicks. I sometimes leave the lamp in the same place and they just move away from it but reducing the heat allows them to get used to the environment quicker. If the winter is harsh there, I would keep it at about 95 degrees or so for about 2 weeks then start to move the lamp away. A thermometer is a good way to keep track of the right temperature! Good luck!
     
  7. suzeqf

    suzeqf Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Mar 17, 2011
    When I brood my chicks I use a big cardboard box with a lamp at one end and to regulate the heat i move the lamp up, when the chicks are under a week old i usually keep my brooder around 95 and make sure i have a cool spot and 2nd week i'll move it up a bit and i usually watch the chicks to make sure they are warm enough if they are always hudled then they are cold but if they are spread out they are comfy and if they are at the cool end they are too hot, i try to keep my brooder around 85 from week 2-4 depending on the temp outside it's ranges from 30-50 here so i keep the brooder around 90 but when in the spring when the temp is around 75ish outside and in the shop/garage i will turn the light off during the day and only turn it on at night when the chicks are around 4 weeks old and this is also the time i start introducing them to the flock i put them in the baby pen inside the coop and when they are fully feathered or the temps are above 70 is when i put them in the coop with everyone else and by that time they know who they are and don't mess with them
     
  8. sphillips

    sphillips Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Feb 18, 2013
    New Mexico
    Thanks everyone! I think the bathtub is going to work fine, and I've checked out the garage, not drafty, so I think they will be fine in there. I am guessing that watching the chicks behavior will tell you if they are warm enough/too warm. I can do this![​IMG]
     
  9. realsis

    realsis Crazy for Silkies

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    Jan 17, 2013
    California
    hi yes you can do this! it will be loads of fun! yes I recommend using a thermometer. it takes the guess work out and you will know for sure the temp. I have chicks right now. I keep them in a large card board box. mine are six weeks old already! but I attached a heat lamp and every week reduce the heat by 5 degrees. watch the chicks they will tell you if they are cold or hot. if they huddle under the heat lamp they are cold if they are far from the lamp and wings out from the body they are hot. they should be evenly dispersed. happy chicks make happy peeping sounds, not shrill loud distress sounds. you can see if they are comfortable by the sound. also put small marbles in the water to keep them from drowning. hope this helps and welcome!
     

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