NEWBY QUESTIONS

Discussion in 'Meat Birds ETC' started by longranger, May 2, 2009.

  1. longranger

    longranger Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Apr 23, 2009
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    I am a suburban farmer getting into chickens for the second time. First time, which was strictly for eggs, was stopped by unhappy neighbors. Now due to zoning and a larger property I can have lots of hens and even get away with a rooster or 2.

    Now the questions. First I want to confirm my impression that most Roos including mixed purpose varieties and egglaying types are culled for eating at an age that extreme recipes are not needed?? Likewise with hens that have reached permanent henopause?? I ask these questions to help me feel good about my plans for flock management. Specificly I want to cull trouble makers and freeloaders for the freezer. Is that what most others do?? Yes I really am that green in flock management and the concept of using the birds as meat.

    The second more general question is how to deal with fellow chicken lovers who appear to want to throw in a near free roo with every pullet or mature hen you purchase. I understand that some are great foundation birds for a new flock but don't the sellers have to assume that many or most will go to the freezer?? That being the case is it rude to say no to a young roo as part of a "package" purchase or let the seller know what his likely end would be??

    Thanks for the shared wisdom.

    Mike
     
  2. Ridgerunner

    Ridgerunner True BYC Addict

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    Feb 2, 2009
    Northwest Arkansas
    I want to confirm my impression that most Roos including mixed purpose varieties and egglaying types are culled for eating at an age that extreme recipes are not needed??

    Yes. Once they reach a certain size, the cost of feed per pound of weight gain really drops. And after a certain size weight gain is mostly fat and the meat just gets tougher. Eat them as friers or roasters.

    Likewise with hens that have reached permanent henopause??

    These are stew hens. Some laying breeds, like leghorns, don't have a lot of meat on them and some people don't think it is worth the effort to process them. They compost them, craigslist them for giveaway, or otherwise get rid of them, but I find chicken and dumplins real comfort food.

    Specificly I want to cull trouble makers and freeloaders for the freezer. Is that what most others do??

    Yes. I also mark any that exhibit traits I don't want in my breeding flock for the table. This could include personality, deformity, slow growing, difficulty hatching, whatever.

    The second more general question is how to deal with fellow chicken lovers who appear to want to throw in a near free roo with every pullet or mature hen you purchase. I understand that some are great foundation birds for a new flock but don't the sellers have to assume that many or most will go to the freezer?? That being the case is it rude to say no to a young roo as part of a "package" purchase or let the seller know what his likely end would be??

    Ask me no questions, I'll tell you no lies. How you handle it is entirely up to you. In my opinion, if someone does not put restrictions when they sell or give away a bird, you are under no obligations. If you are negotiating a purchase, you can say "no" to any part of it until the agreement is reached without being rude. But when you are dealing with people, you have to deal with people and all of us are different. I know this does not answer your question but I just don't have a good answer.
     
  3. jjparke

    jjparke Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Apr 20, 2008
    Boise
    I only take my extra roo's to about 4 months old. Seems that's when they really start to become roo's and when the bulk of weight gain is done and I've heard they get tougher and tougher from there. Second, I wouldn't feel bad at all about not taking someone's extra roos ever. It's your land, time and dollar. But also beware of bringing new birds into your flock. You have to be careful of diseases.
     

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