Newcastle question

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by lbidder114, Feb 12, 2013.

  1. lbidder114

    lbidder114 Out Of The Brooder

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    Mar 11, 2012
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    Long story short I think I have a bird with Newcastle. She is being euthanized tomorrow at the state lab and tested. If she does have it does that mean I will loose the rest of my flock or will I have to have them all put down? I have already lost 3 about a month ago to the same symptoms!
     
  2. lbidder114

    lbidder114 Out Of The Brooder

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    Mar 11, 2012
    Hill , NH
    All I want to know is if I have birds that were not vaccinated will they get this and die too! This is stressing me out big time and no one knows the answer to this?!?
     
  3. dawg53

    dawg53 Humble

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    I doubt you're dealing with Newcastle's disease, it's rare in this country. It's also highly contageous and lethal. I believe it's a reportable disease as well.
    Here's a link, scroll down to Newcastle's Disease and read about it if you wish.
    http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/ps044
     
    Last edited: Feb 12, 2013
  4. lbidder114

    lbidder114 Out Of The Brooder

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    Mar 11, 2012
    Hill , NH
    I think that is why the state lab wants her put down tomorrow to be tested, all of her symptoms and the past 3 that died all sound like Newcastle
     
  5. Michael Apple

    Michael Apple Overrun With Chickens

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    So you aren't sure if the bird really has Newcastle. Newcastle is a virus so it will run it's course. Young birds gasp, cough, have a rattle in the throat and often make a hoarse chirping sound and then nervous symptoms set in. Symptoms like paralysis,walking in circles, twisted necks, and some have been known to somersault.

    Older birds don't have the nervous symptoms but will have the respiratory signs. The older fowl can survive with a run of antibiotics and vitamins to ward off secondary infections. Newcastle robs vitamin A from the body so the older birds would need vitamins with high vitamin A. If the bird tests positive for Newcastle, I wouldn't cull my flock. Any new flock you bring in still run the risk of getting Newcastle because it can be brought on the premises by wild birds, rodents, or even you from the environment outside your chicken yard. That is why you'll be advised to vaccinate all new birds you bring onto your property. There is a Newcastle and Bronchitis vaccine that can be used in the drinking water. You would have to vaccinate every 4 months for prevention.
     
  6. dawg53

    dawg53 Humble

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    Let us know the results when you get the chance, thanks.
     
  7. lbidder114

    lbidder114 Out Of The Brooder

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    Mar 11, 2012
    Hill , NH
  8. lbidder114

    lbidder114 Out Of The Brooder

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    Mar 11, 2012
    Hill , NH
    That was the last 3 girls they were 6 months old, all the symptoms you listed. This bird is a year old she is so weak and thin at this point I don't know if I could save her but I will do all I can to save the rest.
     
  9. dawg53

    dawg53 Humble

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    Actually, I've seen birds with Infectious Coryza and/or Infectious Bronchitis with similar symptoms. I think it would be best to wait for the necropsy results.
     
  10. Michael Apple

    Michael Apple Overrun With Chickens

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    Do you know if they make just an IB vaccine? And does it have to be done every four months like the Newcastle-IB vaccine? I know poultrymen/women used to use sodium sulfamethazine for Coryza, but if the respiratory symptoms remained they'd treat CRD symptoms with Tylan 50.
     
    Last edited: Feb 12, 2013

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