Newly hatched chick with leg that refuses to straighten out

Discussion in 'Raising Baby Chicks' started by Prairie Orca, Jan 31, 2012.

  1. Prairie Orca

    Prairie Orca Out Of The Brooder

    My only suspicion is a slipped tendon and I've tried four times already to fix it (gently push leg back and massage tendon into place) but it won't budge and it causes the chick to shriek bloody murder (which worries me as I think it's a pain shriek). The leg will not straighten out. The chick hatched a few hours ago.

    Here's a 38-second video since it won't stay still for a picture:
    http://s11.photobucket.com/albums/a192/Fallaryn/Chickens/?action=view&current=120121_egg5v.mp4

    Is there anything I can do for it?
     
  2. ChickensAreSweet

    ChickensAreSweet Heavenly Grains for Hens

  3. Happy Chooks

    Happy Chooks Moderator Staff Member

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  4. LuisaD

    LuisaD Out Of The Brooder

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    Jan 27, 2012
    ^ those were my chickies and I tried everything I could do for a week, and then their hocks started swelling up and they just kept getting worse and worse, and less flexible. I ultimately took them to get put down, knowing it was for the best as their quality of life kept going down. Watch it for a day or two but chances are its not going to get better! :( sorry, wish I could be more encouraging!
     
  5. Prairie Orca

    Prairie Orca Out Of The Brooder

    @ ChickensAreSweet: Thank you for the link. That's the one I consulted for instructions on how to straighten the leg, which hasn't worked to date.

    @ Happy Chooks: Thank you for the link. Well, the little one finally stayed still long enough for a picture, though not at a great angle I suppose. The leg isn't twisted like those in the thread you shared with me, although it seems to be jutted out a bit from the hip. When I look at the leg from behind I can see that it is slightly out of place - the lower leg seems to be set further to the right (from the back view) compared to the upper leg. Last night my mom and I carefully wrapped and medical-taped some gauze around the hock to prevent it from being rubbed so much. I initially considered splinting it, but I couldn't see how that would help since I can't even get the leg to straighten out.

    [​IMG]

    @ LuisaD: Thank you for your response. I'm sorry you lost your chicks. If the chick's quality of life doesn't improve I'll likely put it down.
     
  6. LuisaD

    LuisaD Out Of The Brooder

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    Jan 27, 2012
    Mine didn't start out crooked.. not to get your hopes down, but i kept trying.. is he keeping one leg up or just crawling on his hocks? i had 2 who for 2 days crawled on their hocks and then got up one day and now are doing great. Also, I knew it was getting worse becuase their flexibility from pulling it back was getting worse and worse daily... :( just things to look for! hope it works out!
     
  7. Prairie Orca

    Prairie Orca Out Of The Brooder

    The chick is hopping around on one leg, which is worrying me a bit since I've noticed that the good leg is now starting to bow inward. When it's not eating, drinking, or sleeping, it usually leans against the toy stuffed parrot that is in the brooder.

    The bad leg is the same as ever - stuck in resting position. It has slightly more flexibility now (only when I check, as the chick doesn't use it) and the hock is not flaring up at all, so I'm being cautiously optimistic. I'm still not 100% sure if it's a slipped tendon.

    Yesterday another chick suddenly had a slipped tendon in its left leg. I knew for sure that's what it was since I picked it up right away and did the trick where you stretch their leg behind them - the tendon snapped back into place so easily (I was really surprised). That chick uses the leg but it doesn't/can't straighten it out on its own (it tries to use the foot), so I did some more searching online and am trying a method where you duct tape around the hock to hold the tendon in place (found it here). To me it has a dual purpose - hold the tendon in place, and keep the hock from being rubbed.
     
  8. LuisaD

    LuisaD Out Of The Brooder

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    I think it's great that you're being so optimistic and I hope it has a happy ending!!! Just wanted to let you know, when I took it to the bird rescue, they told me some birds are born without the tendon or a very weak one due to the nutrition the mother is given before she lays her egg, and if its born with a problem its harder to fix then if something were to just occur... But thats very cool that you were able to heal one of your chickies!
     

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