NEWWWWW question for kedreeva or anyone else that might know?

Discussion in 'Incubating & Hatching Eggs' started by emunk80, Jun 26, 2010.

  1. emunk80

    emunk80 In the Brooder

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    Jun 23, 2010
    okay so i think i might of really screwed up my eggs i did so much stuff wrong but a guy helped me fix it he thought but i still am hesitant and theres 40 eggs in there and there due today so i took one and performed an eggtopcy and the chick was formed had feathers but his stomach (im assuming his stomach cuzz ive never done this b4 ) was not inside the bird it was hanging off the end by his anus now yes i did unfortunatelly kill the chick:(....but for the benefit of the group i needed to know if they would make it or not.... there due today and if that was its stomach in that postion are these chicks gonna make it or if they all are like that will they die when they hatch?..
     
    Last edited: Jun 27, 2010
  2. sonjab314

    sonjab314 Constant State of Confusion 8 Years

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    I am no expert but I would not do that. During incubation you have to raise the humidity to 60%-65% and that is too high for the other eggs that are still incubating. If you have the means available, I'd set up another bator and use it for hatching. I have all my eggs in my Hovabator with turner too but I have a LG that I'm gonna use to hatch because I have a staggard hatch. Also if the chicks hatch out in the middle of the night, you may not catch it in time before it gets caught in the turner. Like I said, I am no expert. These are just my thoughts.
     
    Last edited: Jun 26, 2010
  3. What sonjab314 suggested will work. We have two LG incubators, one that we use with an egg turner during incubation, one that is solely for lockdown. It seems to work pretty well. Good luck with your hatch!
     
  4. emunk80

    emunk80 In the Brooder

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    Jun 23, 2010
    this hatch has been a rough one anyways ive messed up a few things but i talked to a guy who knew wgat to do and helped me hopefully get things back on track i took several trays out of the turner and split the incubator so chicks cant get to the other side hopefully it works out
     
  5. Kedreeva

    Kedreeva Longfeather Lane 8 Years

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    I stagger my hatches with an auto turner and I haven't had a problem with the chicks getting caught in the turner.

    HOWEVER, there are mitigating circumstances for my own hatches. I am a *very* light sleeper and I sleep with the incubator pretty much right next to my bed when a hatch starts. I will literally wake up to the crack of an egg zipping. I also keep my dog in the room overnight, as she gets very excited when eggs hatch, which wakes me up if the crack is too quiet. I like the idea of making a separator for the incubator, I may try to design one for my own.

    If I have to leave the area when the hatch is happening (if I have to go to work or something), I will unplug the turner when it is tilted to one side or the other, and turn by hand when I get home, the same as I would do if I didn't have a turner. My turner also has removable racks, and I remove the racks the eggs were on. I would definitely not advise leaving the eggs on the turner, even if you turned it off. In mine at least, the 'flooring' is uneven and will have holes in it for them to slip a leg into and break it trying to get out. Always hatch them on a level surface without hazards if possible.

    My brooder is also set up to care for just-hatched chicks, so that I can take them out of the incubator almost immediately and not have to worry about them getting decapitated by the turner or something like that. In addition to the overhead heating lamp, I have an under-brooder heating pad under a portion of the tank. Within 30-60 minutes, the chicks fluff out on the bottom and can hobble to and from the heat as needed.

    So, it's definitely possible to hatch staggered hatches with a turner, but you have to be able to commit to a way that will not hurt the chicks. If you can't do that, I suggest setting up a separate incubator as a hatcher; you can make a hatcher fairly easily from a styrofoam cooler, a heat source, and a pan of water.
     
    Last edited: Jun 26, 2010
  6. emunk80

    emunk80 In the Brooder

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    Jun 23, 2010
    i also am a very light sleeper and sleep next to my incubator and also set my alarm for every hour just in case one doesnt make much noise well im gonna try it i think ill be alright if i think ones close ill just stay up till its done i guess
     
  7. Kedreeva

    Kedreeva Longfeather Lane 8 Years

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    Jun 10, 2010
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    Good luck with it, and remember, if you're really worried or have to go out or something, you can always unplug the turner for a bit.
     
  8. emunk80

    emunk80 In the Brooder

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    0
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    Jun 23, 2010
    okay so i think i might of really screwed up my eggs i did so much stuff wrong but a guy helped me fix it he thought but i still am hesitant and theres 40 eggs in there and there due today so i took one and performed en eggtopcy and the chich was formed had feathers but his stomach (im assuming his stomahc cuzz ive never done this b4 ) was not inside the bird it was hanging off the end by his anus now yes i did unfortunatelly did kill the chick....but for the benefit of the group i needed to know if they would make it or not.... there due today and if that was its stomach in that postion are these chicks gonna make it or if they all are like that will they die when they hatch?..
     
  9. Redcatcher

    Redcatcher Songster

    May 7, 2010
    At My Desk!
    You do NOT have to kill any chicks towards the end of incubation to see if they are alive. I do not even recommend doing this but it is better than killing a chick. Candle the egg first and trace the air cell. Then carefully break the shell inside the tracing and make a small opening enough to see inside. The membrane will appear white and velvety and you will almost always see some movement under it if the chick is alive. When the chick dies, the membrane will dry out stiffen and become transparent. Put a small bandaid over the opening and put the egg back in the incubator if you see white membrane. It will still hatch and you will know one way or another.
     
  10. emunk80

    emunk80 In the Brooder

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    Jun 23, 2010
    i was not checking for dead or alive chicks i was checking for birth defects that i kind of feared...and i think my hunch was right... my question is will more time allow the rest of the chicks if they have the same problem to develop or because of the problems i had are they most likely all gonna have this deffect and die?
     
    Last edited: Jun 27, 2010

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