Nigerian dwarf goats

Discussion in 'Other Pets & Livestock' started by BrandonM, Aug 2, 2013.

  1. BrandonM

    BrandonM Out Of The Brooder

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    Hey guys, recently i have been very interested in goats, especially nigerian dwarfs goats, mostly for milk production but also goats are awesome! I would like to know as much as possible about these wonder creatures, so if you got any knowledge on goats, please tell me. I would love to hear!
     
  2. onehorse_2000

    onehorse_2000 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    What information are you looking for?
     
  3. BrandonM

    BrandonM Out Of The Brooder

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    May 3, 2013
    Anything from where to buy, what to look for in a good healthy animal to housing, milking and breeding
     
  4. onehorse_2000

    onehorse_2000 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    What are you looking to do with them and what are your expectations? I have does that have milked anywhere from a 1/4 cup up to almost 1/2 a gallon depending on who it was and where in their lacatation. As for where to buy depends on what you want to do, show, milk, pets, brush control, etc. Always, ALWAYS buy from a CAE/CL/Johnes negative herd, we have found healthy looking animals that tested positive for these and sickly looking animals that have tested negative, so that has been a bit of a cr*p shoot there.
     
  5. BrandonM

    BrandonM Out Of The Brooder

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    May 3, 2013
    Looking to get it for milking.
     
  6. Stacykins

    Stacykins Overrun With Chickens

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    If milking is your goal, make sure to get your goats from breeders who concentrate on milk production. NDs are a breed are dairy goats, but not all NDs are great milkers. Start by asking for udder pictures of the mother and sire's mother, if available.
     
  7. BrandonM

    BrandonM Out Of The Brooder

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    May 3, 2013
    When i get the pictures of the udders what do i look for?
     
  8. onehorse_2000

    onehorse_2000 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    For a backyard milker, not going to show, how the udder is built isn't going to be as important, as production. Some NDs are great steady milkers, more are lousy due to people breeding them for pets and being more concerned with color then production. A doe that can consistently produces 2 lbs a day for a good long steady time, would be a doe I would recommend for a back yard milker. Be sure to ask about how long they milk the doe(s) you are looking at for, I have some does that milk great for the first 3 - 4 months and then milk production drops like a rock to the point that it isn't worth me milking them any longer. 2 lbs is about a quart a day, being a pint at morning milking and a pint in the evening, bare in mind, these are little animals, so a quart is pretty good, more is always better and possible, but 2 2lb milkers would produce enough for a small family easily throughout the year.
     
  9. rehric00

    rehric00 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I am planning on getting a NG within a year or so... any good websites with lots of info?

    How long do they live?

    Any ideas of keeping them confined but allowing them some freedom without spending a fortune on a fence that they would jump over anyways...?

    I have 15 acres, but its mostly wooded. I would love to let them roam free, but we have neighbors pretty close and my husband is into landscaping and we have tons of nice plants that we are trying to teach our chickens to stay away from (HA!)
     
  10. Banriona

    Banriona Chillin' With My Peeps

    I am researching them as well with plans to get them in the spring. Here's what I've learned so far in regards to your questions:

    They live 10-15 years depending on how they're raised, how often and how long they are bred/milked etc.

    Portable pens are excellent (4 16' cattle panels attached to each other with zip ties) great way to let them roam around without letting them roam free. A 4' high fence seems sufficient for most ND's but there will always be the stubborn and extra agile ones that escape at every opportunity.

    Goats would rather have your woods than your lawn, so you should be fine fencing in some of those woods. Plan on at least 1/10 acre per adult goat. More is better of course.

    check out www.ndga.org and www.adga.org for good info. I've also had great luck with www.certifiedhumane.org and motherearthnews.com and of course there's always backyardherds.com

    Good luck!
     

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