Nipple waterers

Discussion in 'Feeding & Watering Your Flock' started by Candyhl, Oct 2, 2012.

  1. Candyhl

    Candyhl Out Of The Brooder

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    Are nipple waterers really any better? I can see how they would save the mess, etc. But are they any harder for the chicks/chickens to adapt to considering it isn't their nature to drink from an udder? And how would we go about keeping the lines from freezing in the winter? Does the water continue to flow enough to keep it from freezing?
     
  2. TallChickMagnet

    TallChickMagnet Chillin' With My Peeps

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    My chickens love them. I use both a troff and nipples so that they have plenty of water and a chose. [​IMG]
     
  3. debid

    debid Overrun With Chickens

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    I'm not in PA but I use the nipples on a 5-gallon bucket that's hanging in the coop. It doesn't freeze until we get sustained temperatures somewhere in the neighborhood of 25 degrees (uncommon here). Last winter was so mild that I just limped by through the couple of cold weeks by bringing them warm water. I've been shopping bucket heaters recently, though, because the entire point for me was to be able to leave them alone for a couple of days. You can get a heater that is intended for use in a plastic bucket and has a built-in thermostat so you won't be serving hot water on mild days.
     
  4. ChickenWaterer

    ChickenWaterer Out Of The Brooder

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    Nipple waterer are better because they keep your birds water supply free of contamination. They are also much more pleasant to use because you don't have to rinse out a pan of poop filled water. And wild birds and other critters aren't likely to get into the water when you use a nipple based system. You can check out this post on clean chicken water and this one on steps you can take to ensure clean water for your chickens
     
  5. redhawknc1

    redhawknc1 Out Of The Brooder

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    have been PVC nipple waterers and PVC gravity feeders for the last 3 days...:/​
     
  6. Candyhl

    Candyhl Out Of The Brooder

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    I definitely plan to give them a try. I showed them to my husband and he really seemed to like the idea too. :)
     
  7. Island Roo

    Island Roo Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I'm convinced. Does anyone know which is better - the push-in type or screw-in?

    I'm gonna make bucket waterer and maybe a pvc one for next summer.

    Any other shopping advice - are any brands better or just go for the least expensive on ebay?
     
  8. Island Roo

    Island Roo Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Last edited: Oct 16, 2012
  9. wilobrookfarms

    wilobrookfarms Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I have a question? Would it be possible to add nipples to a heated bucket or heated muck bucket? I have both from my horses, and wondered if it would be an option for the winter? (Bonus, cuz I already have them sitting around[​IMG])
     
  10. Spangled

    Spangled Chillin' With My Peeps

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    My nipple waterers still make a mess; that is why they hang outside with bricks underneath to keep the ground from getting all muddy from the constant dripping from at least one nipple on each bucket, on and off.

    Mine have adapted to the nipples, but I think they drink less water. However, the chickens have remained healthy both summers that we have used the nipple water buckets.

    It's been so much easier to take care of the chickens when I just check the water instead of changing and rehanging the waterers every day. This summer we got float valves in the buckets so I don't even have to fill the buckets with the hose anymore.

    Plus, I love how clean the water is that they're drinking compared to how dirty it sometimes gets from backwashed food. (We don't have much of a poop problem since there's nothing above their waterers for them to sit on.)

    We can't use them in winter. The water lines to them would freeze solid. We'll be putting them away within a month or so, I expect.
     

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