No chicken restrictions but have neighbors

Discussion in 'Local Chicken Laws & Ordinances (and how to change' started by hikerfrog99, Feb 19, 2014.

  1. hikerfrog99

    hikerfrog99 Out Of The Brooder

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    Jan 27, 2014
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    I live in the country. Almost everyone has livestock. My neighbors do not. We both have acreage but unfortunately the houses are close. My chickens are in an enclosed fence but I am looking to buy a rooster to complete my flock. I do not have any problems with my neighbors and have lived here over 2 years but we do not converse either. I don't want to create a problem with the crowing but I don't know how to go about asking them if it would be a nuisance to them. Please help..
     
  2. ChickenLegs13

    ChickenLegs13 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    A good way to start would be to go knock on his door and say "Hey man, I need to talk to you..."
    Hope this helps.
     
  3. hikerfrog99

    hikerfrog99 Out Of The Brooder

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    These are not the kind of people that would even answer their door. They never even pick up the free newspaper. I have waved hello before with no response. [​IMG]
     
  4. ChickenLegs13

    ChickenLegs13 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    You're obviously a good neighbor because you're showing consideration for your other neighbors; so you need to make contact with him. Leave a voice mail or a note on his door asking him to contact you.
    When you make contact tell him what you WOULD LIKE TO DO, not what you ARE GOING TO DO. Tell him to think about it and you'll check back with him in several days to see how he feels about it.
    He may say he works the graveyard shift and wants it quiet at 7 am, that's why he moved to the country in the first place. Then you may have to offer to put the coop on the other side of your house so he won't hear the noise as much. Bribe him with the promise of some fresh eggs.
    You're the one wanting something so you must make a good presentation.
    He may say no problem or he may throw you off his property. One thing though, he's not going to chop you up & eat you.
    Ultimately it's your property and you can do whatever the heck you want, with or without his consent. As long as you're not breaking any laws or ordinances your neighbor can go pound sand if he don't like it.
     
  5. hikerfrog99

    hikerfrog99 Out Of The Brooder

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    Jan 27, 2014
    South Carolina
    I do see him outside alot playing with his children. His wife is home all day. I called the county so I know there are no restrictions. My husband says the same thing about him not liking it. We really just want the too more for protection of the flock and we actually enjoy the crowing lol. Thanks for your help. I may just have to put on my big girl undies and ask when I see him outside lol
     
  6. LeslieDJoyce

    LeslieDJoyce Overrun With Chickens

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    I believe being courteous, but only up to a point.

    This might sound weird, but after living in both the city and the country I think a person sets a bad precedence when they try to give responsibility for their own decisions to their neighbors. IF your neighbor goes to that much effort to put up invisible barriers between your two families, I'd say he has told you all he needs to about how many of your decisions he wants to be involved in. None.

    I have several roosters in my chicken coop so have more crowing that strictly necessary ... and if my windows are closed I can't really hear any of them crowing. Roosters can and will crow all night and all day, especially if they see a light come on at night, so other people's schedules don't really factor in.

    Put the chicken coop as far away from their house as is reasonable. Try to block the lights with evergreen trees. Think about your own lights that can be seen from the coop. If the neighbor comes by to complain, tell him you can try again with a different rooster (some roosters only crow a few times a day), or advise him about the light thing. You might even mention that you thought it best to not trouble him this decision as you sense a desire for privacy.

    But I'd anticipate he wouldn't want to open the door to that kind of dialog as then he might be expected to comply with your future whims in exchange.
     
  7. hikerfrog99

    hikerfrog99 Out Of The Brooder

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    Jan 27, 2014
    South Carolina
    Great ideas. Thanks again for your advice [​IMG]
     
  8. Sonoran Silkies

    Sonoran Silkies Flock Mistress

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    I would make reasonable compromises in how you keep the birds, as suggested, but I do not think you should ask, or even tell your neighbor. If he doesn't like it, tough beans; it is allowed, and you will make reasonable efforts to keep the rooster from crowing in his bedroom window all night long. That is enough. If he willingly acknowledged you, waved, spoke when y'all are both out in the yard or responded to friendly gestures, telling him that you are getting a rooster would be more in keeping with your relationship, but since he avoids talking to you, why would you go out of your way to force a conversation on him?
     
  9. hikerfrog99

    hikerfrog99 Out Of The Brooder

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    Jan 27, 2014
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    Very true. I just may not do so.
     

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