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no egg at greater than 24 weeks of age

Discussion in 'Chicken Behaviors and Egglaying' started by prepare2xl, Sep 10, 2010.

  1. prepare2xl

    prepare2xl New Egg

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    Aug 12, 2010
    Our eldest surviving hen (2 of her cohorts died of a paralytic condition, 2 vanished from the coop, 1 was a rooster) is more than 24 weeks of age. She has yet to lay an egg. She lives with 4 8-9 week old pullets, eating starter food and tap water. Shall we remain patiently optimistic, or is she unlikely to lay?
     
  2. chick4chix

    chick4chix Chillin' With My Peeps

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    My latest egg layer wasn't until 32 weeks of age and she's a great layer now.
    The first egg came at 21.5 weeks and they were all the same age and raised together. They are individuals, and develop at slightly different times- even within the same breed. Try to hang on and be patient, she'll get to it when she's ready [​IMG]
    It's hard waiting for that first egg- but it's like finding a buried treasure when you finally get it!

    Oh... and I don't think she's too young to start her on layer ration. What do others think?? I've heard mixed ideas on it- some think to wait til their first egg- others start at laying age. I started them all on it when the first one laid - so the last one was on it for almost 11 weeks before she laid an egg [​IMG] It might be hard for you to seperate your younger pullets from the layer rations?
     
    Last edited: Sep 10, 2010
  3. Boo-Boo's Mama

    Boo-Boo's Mama Chillin' With My Peeps

    I would not offer layer food for one hen. Flock Raiser can be fed to any age group and oyster shell can be offered in a separate container for the hen who may be laying soon.

    I have pullets that are 21 and 22 weeks old that are not laying yet. The sex links are 24 weeks and all have or are currently laying.

    Good luck. [​IMG]
     
  4. woodmort

    woodmort Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jul 6, 2010
    Oxford NY
    Boo-Boo's Mama :

    I would not offer layer food for one hen. Flock Raiser can be fed to any age group and oyster shell can be offered in a separate container for the hen who may be laying soon.

    I have pullets that are 21 and 22 weeks old that are not laying yet. The sex links are 24 weeks and all have or are currently laying.

    Good luck. [​IMG]

    Agree--I have 10 April pullets--one just started laying--and 32 May hatched pullets that I don't expect to lay for another month or so. I just laid in another 100 lbs of grower today and that'll be what they will all get until those 32 start to lay. I also filled the oyster shell feeder so those laying can get the extra calcium if they need it. With mixed aged chickens you're better off feeding to the younger birds.​
     
  5. prepare2xl

    prepare2xl New Egg

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    Aug 12, 2010
    Thank you for the advice. Our chickens are intended to be pets primarily, and egg producers/composters only as an added benefit. I was just curious about whether we had an odd hen who might never lay. I have been feeding starter-grower feed for the nutritional benefit of the "babies". The bag is nearly empty--I can go to flock raiser with the next purchase. I bought calcium, but am waiting to hang it until she lays; I was concerned the little ones would peck it out of curiosity and wanted to delay their exposure as long as possible.
     
  6. woodmort

    woodmort Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Quote:Oh they will peck at the oyster shells but I doubt it bothers them as much as having to eat layer. Also I suspect my May birds will start laying before this 100 lbs of grower is gone, if they do I'll just mix it with layer. Better to have too much than too little.
     

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