No eggs in like 2 mos!

Discussion in 'Feeding & Watering Your Flock' started by JeenerBeener, Jan 12, 2009.

  1. JeenerBeener

    JeenerBeener New Egg

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    Apr 13, 2008
    Michigan
    [​IMG] We have 17 layers and for the last 2 mos we have had zero eggs. Someone told me, that it is normal for chickens (although last winter we were swamped with eggs!) Now someone else told me that we should increase their protein (esp during cold seasons?) I have not heard this and we did not do this last year. So what is up with chickens heh? They are all about 3 years old and healthy. Is this normal? Any ideas???? I sure appreciate it.
    ~Lori
     
  2. L*A*G*

    L*A*G* Chillin' With My Peeps

    Nov 19, 2008
    planet chicken
    I'm with you, my chickens R NOT LAYING!!! [​IMG]
    it's not that cold in GA, I'm feeding all that WITH NO PAY BACK makes me look at them like thier're smileing at me! [​IMG]
     
  3. MissPrissy

    MissPrissy Overrun With Chickens Premium Member

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    May 7, 2007
    Forks, Virginia
    Hens normally do stop laying int he winter months when the light is decreased.

    Pullets and first year layers tend to plow through the first winter years with no problems. As they reach a mature age they begin to settle in to a normal routine.

    Usually they will molt, stop laying and conserve energy to get through the coldes t winter months. It is a renewing and rejuvinating time for their bodies. They are getting ready for the big spring egg laying season which brings with it broody hens and chicks. [​IMG]

    It is perfectly normal.

    In the winter you really should give them a little extra, maybe some extra scratch, corn or BOSS, to give them extra calories to stay warm and not drop body weight.

    Don't worry. Spring is coming and with it your eggs shall return.

    One more thing - most people don't know - hens lay 240 - 265 eggs a year on average. they do not lay 365 year after year. They have a lot of down time. Only the heartiest of production breeds and commercial layers lay more.
     
  4. L*A*G*

    L*A*G* Chillin' With My Peeps

    Nov 19, 2008
    planet chicken
    Prissy, when do u think they will lay again in GA?
     
  5. MissPrissy

    MissPrissy Overrun With Chickens Premium Member

    24,442
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    May 7, 2007
    Forks, Virginia
    You should see eggs by spring. Make sure they are getting a good diet and layer feed.
     
  6. chickabator

    chickabator Chillin' With My Peeps

    Nov 30, 2007
    ky
    well my rir's are first year layers they turned a year dec. the 5th and they quit laying on me back in october they will lay one every once in a great while which they did lay pretty good a few weeks ago now nothing. DH put cyanne pepper in their food this morning. I will just about try anything to get them laying again
     
  7. digitS'

    digitS' Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Dec 12, 2007
    ID/WA border
    Quote:Would you try a light bulb?

    Steve's digits
     
  8. digitS'

    digitS' Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Dec 12, 2007
    ID/WA border
    That was too flippant and really I'm just trying to get thoughts turned towards the light. A good diet of sufficient protein (not too much) and everything else will only go so far.

    I'm learning that chickens develop more sensitivity to light as their day goes on. Of course, if the day only goes 8 hours - there's little sunlight for them to be sensitive to for very long.

    Lighting has been studied exhaustively by the poultry scientists. Most commercial outfits don't have housing with natural light. One reason is to control heat loss during the Winter but controlling egg production is their biggest concern.

    As I said, the chicken becomes more sensitive to light as the day continues. Apparently, even their combs and wattles are responding to light. After about 11 hours, their bodies are producing the necessary hormones to put them into an egg laying mood.

    If their day doesn't have 11 hours of light, they aren't going to be stimulated very much, the researchers have found. At 8 hours of light, any interest in laying eggs may be shut down, completely.

    There is virtually no part of the US that has 11 hours between sunrise and sunset on December 21st. So, full-on sensitivity is never reached on that day without artificial lighting. Where I live - - 9 hours of sunlight is still a few days away. I doubt if I'd be getting any eggs at all for another month or so without a coop light bulb.

    Steve
     
  9. briteday

    briteday Chillin' With My Peeps

    Dec 16, 2008
    Northern NV

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